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Spotlight: Rochelle Webb, President and Chief Strategy Officer, The Dialectic Compound

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, April 18, 2018


How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

I always knew that I wanted to be in the business of communicating with people. When I was in high school, I thought I would get into that through pictures, photography and visuals. While at Boston College, I figured out that I wanted it all. I became passionate about studying the strategy of advertising and marketing. In a very spontaneous move from Atlanta to L.A., I fell into the game of ‘knowing someone who knew someone’ that got me an entry level gig in a media agency and I never looked back.

I took some pivots here and there from media buying to PR to media strategy and then to global brand marketing. I wanted to be a generalist, so I could be a CMO of a big company one day. I wanted to speak everyone’s language, so that I could be a great leader of people and of a large-end organization, and I felt I had to walk the walk, so I could talk the talk. After falling in love with business, I realized the big company that I would end up running would be my own and that I was destined to be an entrepreneur. Building became my new ‘sexy’ and Fortune 500 was in the rearview. Ever since then, I have been writing my future to cater towards the goal of starting my own venture and utilizing the skills I gathered along my journey.

After 17 years on both agency and client side businesses and finishing business school in the midst of it all, I emerged as an entrepreneur with a heavy focus on marketing. Marketing and strategy are at the core of everything that I do and I don’t regret a single move that I have made along the way.  

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

Work smarter, not harder.

I think this applies to people and strategy development. As a human, you need to arrive in a situation, quickly assess it, and understand where your opportunities for collaboration and value-add lie. You should understand where you can learn the most, as well as, understand the areas that allow you the greatest amount of visibility to decision makers.

But, that is only a small part of the puzzle.

The larger part of navigating the industry chasm is to have the gravitas to understand how to socialize and operationalize your work. This is how you gain traction, earn respect and position yourself to elevate your career. You have to work your audience in a way that doesn’t feel forced, over-confident or entitled.

I have always been results oriented.

I chase success metrics. I have had the opportunity to work on powerful pieces of business in my career, so my motivation has always been in the success of those businesses and being able to clearly identify the areas where my team and I have been able to make an impact.

What excites you most about this industry?

The constant change in marketing and advertising literally gets me out of bed every day! Most people wake up to see what’s going on in politics, I want to know what is going on in marketing. If you blink, you may get left behind.

I am always amazed at the pace at which martech and adtech are moving on a minute-by-minute basis. There is an off the shelf solution for almost anything these days, so teams and brands can be in better command of their own destiny and work smarter. It raises two interesting questions that I have always asked myself… Is it possible to have a ‘successful’ in-house advertising agency in client-side businesses? And what will happen to the traditional agency model as technology plays a bigger role in business? But now, I no longer have to wonder, it is happening before my very eyes and it is exciting to watch.

People are re-inventing themselves and their roles. There is a fresh eagerness to learn in order to stay ahead of the curve. I just hope that hiring managers adopt the creativity to be able to look at today’s talent pool and re-imagine them in these new world roles. There is no longer the ‘perfect resume’… it now relies in the ‘perfect pitch’ for yourself and networking, networking, networking.

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

Advertising is heading towards a more automated future and human assets will begin to play a different type of strategic role. I think media planners will have to start asking themselves, ‘how can we use technology to outsmart our competition?” or “How can we partner more strategically with our media suppliers to provide better brand experience to our consumer?” or “What resources are out there to help us better anticipate the consumer’s needs and make a bigger impact with our brand assets?” Rather than, “how many impressions or clicks does it take to make an impact?”

I am eagerly awaiting the shift in industry where agencies ‘think differently’, as Steve Jobs rightly coined, and am watching today’s planners and strategists revise the future.

In the next five years, we will see leaner teams, but more of them. There will continue to be an evolution of innovation arms to help navigate this impending sea change. We don’t get through this guessing, we have to encourage the habit of being curious and becoming more predictive, so that we prepare our current mid-level managers to be the best leaders that they can be in the future and you do this by always seeking answers to new questions. Today’s mid-level managers need to have the willingness to continue rolling up their sleeves to get the work done. We don’t progress by harnessing ambivalence.

What advice do you have for black advertising professionals that are beginning their career?

Get in where you fit in… and where you don’t. It is important to quickly understand what you do well and lean into that, but more importantly, it is important to understand where you don’t fit in and determine why, and then understand how you can make it clear that you do fit. What I mean by that is that in professional situations, people tend to surround themselves by peers that look like them and very intentionally avoid the ‘agitators’ or people that often speak their mind and represent the unpopular point of view or ‘devil’s advocate’ perspective with the intent of driving innovation. People at the top sometimes see this as more work to invite this perspective into a meeting. But, you can insert yourself by using your intellect and professionalism to show people that the proof is in the pudding, and back it up by being solutions oriented. Bring the problem and the solution. When speaking, use facts, not generalizations. When listening, really listen and play it back, instead of waiting for your turn to speak.

What this doesn’t mean is walking into a company as an assistant media planner, walking into the Account Director’s office and demanding a raise and a promotion. What it does mean is when there is a problem to solve and the answer is not readily available, go to look for it, study it and present it back to the people that are responsible for solving the problem. Show initiative.

I often tell my mentees, “play bigger than you think you are… because than you are playing who you really are.”

 



Photos: Don Lupo

 

What should our industry be talking about in 2018?

The incredibly low percentage of women and minorities in leadership positions. I left agency-side advertising seven years ago to go client-side. And I left client-side corporate America to branch off on my own three years ago to start my own consultancy. I often attend conferences and seminars only to see a very monochromatic group of individuals. There is an adage or a stat that says, “people tend to surround themselves by people that look like them.” Okay, so I get it, there aren’t that many people in leadership that look like me, so how do I change it? I am a change-agent, so I don’t do well in stagnation, which is why I decided if my employers were not going to support my growth, then I have to invest in myself and start my own entity. I got an MBA and started my own company in an effort to stop working for other people. I am absolutely razor-focused on determining my own future success and supporting those that may not be the obvious choice. Those that look like me. 

Any closing thoughts?

I hope that this movement creates real momentum around changing the faces at the top and that we as a culture truly make a shift. I hope this is more than a movement of diversification, but diversity becomes reality. I promise to do my part, but I won’t lie… there are many moments in my day, every day, where I am dis-heartened by what I see. And there are situations that occur that cause me to reflect on my own career where I realize racism played a role, by people who I liked and respected and I thought felt the same about me. And that hurts. I don’t want to hurt anymore.

I stand for change, a brighter future and the rise of the underdog. There are enough powerhouses in the industry that if they continue to take the risks to make sure their voices are heard, that I believe we can turn the industry. I see hope with organizations like ThinkLA that make the conversation around diversity a priority. Using your mindshare to stand up for the under-represented means we have in fact taken a step in the right direction.

Thank you ThinkLA.

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The Dialectic Compound was born to incite immediate change in thriving businesses. It is a collaborative, curious and creative 'Think Tank' of highly seasoned business, marketing and operations executives who are curated from the wild.

Tags:  #MemberSpotlight  #ThinkDIG  #ThinkMembers  Career Advice  DIG 

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Member Spotlight: Cynthia Pena, Account Executive, Marketing and Communications

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, April 11, 2018

 


How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

I studied PR but I kind of fell into advertising. When I graduated, I was working weddings on the side, and a contact through there also worked in the ad world managing events and facilities. While working a month-long agency project under her, I ended up falling in love with the work and culture.

I stayed on in this hybrid role they created including facilities, reception, and barista. I ended up meeting a ton of people in the agency, (learned how to make bomb lattes) and within a few months, I easily transferred into their PR department. Ever since, I’ve always been involved in events in some capacity, but my main focus has been agency communications and marketing.

 

 

What excites you most about this industry?

The fact it’s always evolving. The ways brands are reaching consumers and joining conversations are never the same. When you see someone do it in a clever way and actually add value, it’s gold.

Why are you involved with ThinkLA?

It’s the perfect opportunity to not only meet and network with others throughout LA, but also to make a difference and impact the events in our industry. Even early in your career, you have a voice and opinions, ThinkLA lets you explore both.

What’s the best advice you’d give to someone interested in a career in advertising? Are there any written materials you suggest to read?

Find someone already doing what you want to do and ask for coffee or 10 minutes of their time. See what you can learn from them and how they got to where they are.

For reading materials: Read the trades! Know what’s going on in the industry, the trends, the changes. It’s all valuable.



Photos: Martin Aranda

 

Tags:  #Memb  #MemberSpotlight  #ThinkMembers  Marketing  Member Spotlight  Members  Team One  Team One USA  ThinkLA  ThinkMembers 

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Member Spotlight: Pete Favat, North American Chief Creative Officer, Deutsch

Posted By Emily Hope, Tuesday, April 3, 2018

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

It started in grade school. I started drawing stuff and became the go-to-guy for posters: sports, proms, yearbooks, anything. When I was 14, I was designing restaurant menus. People came to me for marketing because I drew all the time.

My road map has been to go with my gut. I was a CCO at 29. I mean, it was my own company, but I was running Converse.

How I got to Deutsch is really interesting and unplanned. Honestly, there are many times I have thought about leaving the industry and then something happens and I stay. I realized that the job doesn’t always need to be the one you thought it was. You can create your own. You can make docu-films or create an art show to help homeless people, like what we did with 100 Pieces. I have been able to use this job to do other things that satisfy my creative needs. What keeps me in advertising right now is that no one knows where the business is going and it is exciting. It keeps me young. The one thing I do know is that doing good is a passion.

Once, a reporter referred to me as a bonafide expert in advertising. If I’m ever an expert in anything, it’s time to quit.

 


Photo courtesy of Deutsch

 

What keeps you motivated?

If I’m not making something it’s because I died.

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned so far?

We can use our creative talents to make the world better. Sometimes people look down on advertising but what they don’t realize is that we have the ability to creatively move humanity forward. Advertising is starting to get a whiff of that and award it.

What excites you most about this industry?

The opportunity to help change the world with our creativity. We can partner with corporations to make the world better. And at the end of the day, that is what consumers want in 2018.

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

Brands are starting to understand that being a purpose-driven company and putting the good back into humanity is the currency of the future. People will buy things based on their emotional attachment to the way a company behaves. With so much competition, all product is parody. You create a product and in two weeks, you’ll have the same product made by someone else. People will buy with their hearts.

What advice do you have for those just starting in advertising?

“Hate something, change something.” Taken from Honda’s 2004 “Grrr” campaign. Advertising is rapidly changing into something else. And if you don’t like it, you’re probably a good candidate to change it from the inside.

What does 2018 hold for you, and for Deutsch?

That’s the beauty: I have no idea and a ton of ideas. We just start trying things and experimenting. If you don’t, you’ll sink. But to start, let’s make sure we’re doing right by our people and creating a culture where they feel safe. That’s how great work gets made.

Any closing thoughts for the ThinkLA community?

L.A. is at an inflection point that I’ve never before seen in my career. I’ve worked in London, Boston, Sweden, China, and all over the U.S. and I have never seen the collision of creativity and the fusion of film, music, and entertainment. The only thing missing is fashion. L.A. doesn’t get any credit for fashion. Every day, I think this is the best time and place to be in the ad business. L.A. has a ton of opportunity. Relish it. If you’re a creative person, you can do anything you want. The world is wide open. You have just as much of a chance as the next person.

 

 

Tags:  #MemberSpotlight  #ThinkMembers  Deutsch  Los Angeles 

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Spotlight: Shari Holly, Program Director, PIPELINES

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, March 21, 2018

When we made the call for our Women of Color in Advertising list,  we were thrilled to be introduced to a true champion of diversity and inclusion: Shari Holly. Shari is the Program Manager for PIPELINES at PRETTYBIRD, a non-profit aiming to close the access and opportunity gap by connecting underrepresented talent directly to opportunities and programs in tech and creative industries through a mobile app and series of engaging programs.

 


Photos: Don Lupo Photography


How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

My career road map is rather unconventional. Growing up in Detroit, at the time there weren’t many other black women pursuing creative careers, starting businesses, or creating non-traditional methods for success. There was a stigma (which is what I was taught) to find a stable and secure job (government, lawyer, teacher doctor), climb the corporate ladder, and retire with a sweet pension: the good ole’ American dream. I knew I was born a creative, but you really don’t know what you don’t know, and furthermore, without much access or role models, pursuing creative careers seems rather far-fetched in a sense.

I moved to Kalamazoo (yes, it’s a real city), graduated from college with a degree in Business and Spanish, and formed the idea along the way that I wanted to work in Immigration Reform and/or International Business. I wasn’t until I moved to Chicago and worked for the Tribune that I’d realize that I actually belong in Media and Entertainment, not the government. Working in advertising at the Tribune exposed me to a world of creative and media that I long to know more about and this is where my creative career was born.

After reaching my wits' end with Chicago’s brutal weather, I moved to LA never having been here before and made looking for a job full time. A month later, I landed a job (which apparently rarely happens to transplants who move here) working for a direct-response advertising agency assisting a media buyer. I didn’t love it. Numbers and post logs have never been my thing. I did that for about a year before moving on to a post-production house where I worked in Digital Media Services.

In my two and a half years here, I learned quite a bit about new age media and how VOD platforms are drastically changing the way content is digested. It was very interesting, but as much as I learned, I had reached a point in my career of having the strong desire to do something purposeful. Spending 75% of my life at a job that didn’t have purpose or give back was not something I wanted to do anymore.

I came across an opportunity to be a Diversity Program Manager for PromaxBDA. I had zero experience in D&I or Program Development but knew this would be an opportunity I would enjoy and would find purpose. Kat, the VP who interviewed me (and now, my lifelong mentor) took a chance on me and hired me because she felt my passion and commitment to this cause. It was at PromaxBDA that I realized for the first time in my life, that this is where I belonged. This work is the work that I want to do for a lifetime, and that’s to commit to doing what I can to close the access and opportunity gap for aspiring, yet underrepresented creatives, to increase inclusion in our creative industries and to create space of belonging for minorities in this industry.

After PromaxBDA, I worked with the Directors Guild of America and the Association of Independent Commercial Producers to jumpstart their first-ever Commercial Directors Diversity Program, then moved on to PRETTYBIRD, where I am currently spearheading the PIPELINES diversity and inclusion initiative. Here, we are taking a radical, unconventional approach to connecting underrepresented talent to our tech and creative industries through a mobile app. We also host a series of engaging programs and events for our demo as well. I am committed to this and exactly where I belong!

 

 

 

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

On a personal level, life genuinely keeps me motivated. I never take a day that I wake up in the morning for granted. Every (new) day that I have is another literal opportunity to do something different, to take my purpose to a higher level, to be thankful for my many blessings, to spread truth and peace.

Professionally, the amount of work that still needs to be done to create more direct paths the underrepresented to opportunities in our creative industries is what keeps me motivated. I have a “can’t stop, won’t stop” mentality when it comes to my work.

My personal and forever motto is “I don’t need easy; I just need possible”. I heard this in a movie called “Swimfan” and coined it as my personal mantra in everything that I do.

What excites you most about this industry?

That it’s always, always changing, and that the opportunities are limitless. Entertainment and Media are very unique industries that constantly require adaptability and change… and I love change.

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

Hopefully, advertising is moving away from the "safe" and "traditional" and gravitating more towards the radical, boundary-pushing work that’s reflective and inclusive. I believe the next five years look like more biracial parents in commercials, more VR experiences to increase empathy in our branding for example. Brands will also face a challenge of engaging a particular, demanding, and technology-dependent demo. Brands will have to connect with their diverse demo on a deeper, personal, and more emotional level as it’s becoming more about the person and less about the masses. What a time to be alive!

What advice do you have for black advertising professionals who are beginning their careers?

There was a clip we shot of Omar Johnson, former CMO of Beats, explaining his experiences being the “only black person in the room” and what we expressed was so simple yet so powerful and something I will never, ever forget. Being black and in entertainment, there will be many times you will experience being in meetings/rooms/sets where no one or hardly anyone looks like you and while many will view this as a disadvantage, it’s actually quite the opposite. It boils down to perspective. He expressed that once he shifted his perspective, so did the dynamic in his interactions. He said that he views being the only black person in the room as a superpower. A superpower! That your views and ideas are unique, much needed, and unlike any other perspective the majority can offer. You can empathize in ways others cannot. You can offer a view that is special and autonomous. No one can offer your (necessary) view except for you and that is where you find your power, your confidence, your authenticity in your work. A light bulb went off as I watched this clip and not only have I shifted my own perspective, but I encourage other black creatives and professionals to do the same.

What should our industry be talking about in 2018?

What they can be doing specifically to create an inclusive work environment and how they can change/revamp their hiring practices and culture to attract, hire, and retain more diverse talent? Aside from the fact that having more inclusive teams and work environments increase the bottom line, the world and the world of entertainment is evolving drastically and company cultures must do the same.

Any closing thoughts?

“If you don’t prioritize your being, your doing will suffer. It’s simple, but not easy.” – Robyn Ward

 

 

Tags:  #ThinkDIG  #thinkMembers  Diversity  Diversity in Advertising  Member Profiles  Member Spotlight 

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Member Spotlight: Carron Brown, VP, Account Director, The Integer Group

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, March 7, 2018


Photos: Don Lupo Photography

 

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

A dear friend at Leo Burnett encouraged me to get started in advertising. She was aware of my skillset and knew that my personality and expertise were a good fit for the advertising world. She was absolutely correct. It wasn’t until I began in advertising that I truly felt at home.

Prior to advertising, my background was in entertainment and technology. Therefore, I was able to make an immediate impact in my first agency role on the Universal Pictures account. This account brought all of my passions together under one roof. I was afforded the opportunity to combine my affinity for entertainment, multicultural marketing, media and content creation. Ever since, I’ve built my career with accounts that tap into my passion points and allow me to show up, each and every day, genuinely excited about the challenges and opportunities ahead.

I’ve recently joined the Omnicom family. I work on the AT&T account through the commerce agency, The Collective. In this role, I reside at the intersection of branding, selling, entertainment and technology. I felt that bringing the advertising experience full circle, and closing the loop at retail, was an important skill to add to my portfolio.

 

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

I stay motivated knowing that I’m assisting a brand in finding their authentic voice, and shaping that brand story in a way that connects to the target audience in a meaningful way.

My personal motto is derived from something Maya Angelou once said, “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” I apply that in everything I do, and I aim to move in a way that encourages others, and empowers them to become their best selves.


What excites you most about this industry?

This industry is full of unapologetic passion and energy, and that’s contagious. We have the power to shape the way people see themselves and their place in the world. When used for good, that power is magical.
 

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

The future belongs to the companies that stand for something, and that's exciting. There’s increasingly a price to be paid for neutrality, and this is forcing brands to find their voice, have a POV and move with intention.

In the next five years, agencies will be called upon for their strategic and cultural expertise, in equal proportion to their creative services.


What advice do you have for black advertising professionals that are beginning their career?

Embrace your empirical knowledge. The industry needs many different voices and experiences in order to offer clients well-rounded solutions. The industry is in desperate need of unique points of view. I would give that advise to any person starting out in advertising. Don’t allow your age or level of experience to shape your perception of your value. We’re in a business of culture, and an agency’s cultural currency is only as valuable as the sum experiences of its members. Your unique life experience is an asset. Treat it as such.

What should our industry be talking about in 2018?

In 2018, it’s time to officially acknowledge our new blended world as a reality, and not a niche market. While targeted marketing efforts are still very much needed, in order to ensure that we’re speaking with an audience, and not just at them; our definition of “general market” must quickly expand.


Any closing thoughts?

Be present. It’s all moving so fast.

Tags:  #MemberSpotlight  #ThinkDIG  #ThinkMembers  Career Advice  DIG 

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Spotlight: Bryanna Goecke, Ad Relief President, and Account Executive at Us Weekly

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, February 28, 2018


Photos: Don Lupo Photography

 

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

I am slightly embarrassed to admit that I completely fell into the world of advertising. Growing up in Colorado, I had no idea that there was an entire industry dedicated to advertising, much less that it would be the perfect fit for me. I’ve always been an extrovert and enjoyed interacting with new people, and I’ve always been intrigued by the human psyche and knowing what makes people tick. From about the time I was in middle school, I was convinced I wanted to be a criminal profiler for the FBI; I was reading books like John Douglass’ Mindhunter about 20 years before Netflix made it cool. I was absolutely fascinated by the concept that you could study someone’s personality and past behavior to predict their future actions. I eventually decided I was not cut out for law enforcement. I had a Bachelor’s degree with a double-major in Psychology and Sociology, yet only a vague career goal of finding a niche where I could apply my understanding of human behavior and love for working with people.

During this time, I had also been managing a movie theatre to get through school. Right after graduation, one of my old co-workers approached me about coming to work with him as a Sales Planner at NCM Media Networks, which is the company that did all the in-theatre advertising at my theatre. Although I honestly had no idea what a planner was, I already knew the company was fantastic from working with them during my theatre days, so I jumped headfirst into the role. As soon as I started, I fell in love with the advertising world. I immediately knew that my end goal was to work in Advertising Sales. It was the absolute perfect fit—who knew there was a job completely dedicated to interacting with people and homing in on consumers’ behaviors to drive product sales?! I was lucky to work at a company where my management team was really vested in the success of their employees and helped foster our goals. They knew my passion was in sales so they helped me transfer to the LA Sales office to dive into the market.

It’s always been important to me to think one step ahead of my career path to create direct, actionable steps to get where I want to go. Just like I knew I needed to move to LA when I was working in Colorado, I already knew I wanted to develop my sales knowledge by working at Turner during the time I was at NCM. I actively networked and prepared for that role so I was ready when a position opened up. Similarly, while I was developing my skills as a planner, I was determined to move into a Digital Sales role with a reputable, trusted brand like Us Weekly. I took digital training courses, met people in the digital realm, and attended as many networking events as I could to help prepare me for my current role.

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

I’m a firm believer that the best motivation always intrinsically comes from within. I constantly challenge myself to learn something new, improve my current skills, or do something that terrifies me until I’ve mastered it enough to lose the fear. I will never be a finished product; I know I can’t be complacent because everything I struggle through now will help me prepare for the road ahead.

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned so far?

Don’t be afraid to be your awesome, crazy, authentic self. When I was first contemplating moving into advertising sales, I had this picture in my head of a slimy cars salesman who would say anything to drive business. I knew I couldn’t be that person, and questioned if I had what it took to succeed in sales. I have no poker face. I can’t even tell a white lie to my dog. I decided to embrace my own style and hope for the best. I am so thankful that I did because I quickly learned that you get further by letting people see your quirky, unique personality than by trying to fit yourself into a pre-set mold. I think my candidness has played a pivotal role in helping me build long-lasting, trusting relationships that allow me to be successful in my career.

 What excites you most about this industry?

I love that the industry is constantly changing. Every day is a new adventure and it’s so exciting to be a part of the evolution. I remember when I was first starting out in advertising over a decade ago, I was tasked with helping our company figure out how to sell digital as a brand new product. To this day I think we are still being tasked with this same challenge of changing our products and sales models to keep up with the latest offerings. It keeps you on your toes and makes things interesting.

 What advice do you have for those just starting in advertising? Take some time to really think about your career path and where you would like to be five years from now, 10 years from now, and 20 years from now. Plan out actionable steps. Once you know what you want, tell everyone about it. If you have goals and are ready to work hard to get there, people will support you. We are so lucky to be a part of the LA advertising community—I have seen time and time again that it is one big family where everyone wants to help raise each other up.

None of the opportunities I’ve had in my career would have been there without the strong support net of my industry family at NCM, Turner, and Ad Relief. When I first started out in advertising, they gave me projects to help teach me how to be a good seller, they introduced me to people who worked at the companies they knew I wanted to work at, and they always went to bat for me when it was time to move to the next position. The relationships you make are everything.

With that said, you also need to be ready to hustle. Take an active role in your own success. Say yes to every project that comes across your desk, even if it will require long hours and may fall way out of your comfort zone. Every assignment is an opportunity to learn something new and become a stronger asset.

Last but not least, put yourself out there. Meet as many people as you can. Go to every ThinkLA and Ad Relief event that you can possibly squeeze in. Any time you are invited to go out with co-workers or clients, say yes. This is a small community and you will be working with the same people for years to come, so make connections. Jump out of your comfort zone and say hi to a stranger.

How did you get started with Ad Relief?

When I first moved to LA, one of my co-workers invited me to go to the annual Ad Relief Movie Night. At the time I didn’t fully grasp what the organization was all about. I thought it was just another opportunity to go hang out with people in the advertising industry. Once I learned more about the charity, how events like the Movie Night and November Luncheon raise money for people in our advertising community who are going through a life crisis, I knew I wanted to become more involved. I’ve now been a part of the organization for about four years and am honored to have been inaugurated as President this year.

The events are always the fun part, but by far the most demanding and rewarding part of Ad Relief is acting as a case worker on the board to help our friends, co-workers, and colleagues who are going through difficult times. While we keep everything strictly confidential to protect the people we help, at any given time we may be assisting anywhere from one to dozens of fellow colleagues in the LA advertising community. No two cases are alike—we’ve provided support for everything from cancer treatments, to homes burning down, to industry vets who suddenly find themselves homeless and unemployed with a growing pile of medical bills. It is one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever been a part of and I am so thankful that my co-worker brought me to that first event.

 What does 2018 hold for you, and for Ad Relief?

This is already looking to be a very busy year for Ad Relief. Unfortunately, the constant changes in the advertising landscape have pushed more people into hard times than ever before. We are constantly working to grow the organization to support the increased need we are seeing from the community. We are also very excited to welcome several new board members this year! In partnership with the new members, we are working hard to raise awareness for Ad Relief across all sectors of the advertising community, from digital to radio, as well as brainstorm some fun new events.

 Any closing thoughts?

It would only be right to give a quick shout out to ThinkLA. You have played such a big part in my career development, and I am so thankful that you are here to support me and the rest of the LA advertising community! If anyone reading this has not yet gone to a ThinkLA event, you definitely need to make it a priority!

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Are you interested in supporting Ad Relief

  • You can support the Ad Relief mission by attending their events throughout the year. The first event of 2018 is Bubbles & Brews on March 8 at OMD/Chiat. Considering the open bar, food, and games are all included in the $50 ticket price, it’s a great deal, and they always have an amazing turnout.
  • When shopping on Amazon, use smile.amazon.com and select “Advertising Industry Emergency Fund” from the list of charities. By doing this, Amazon donates 0.05% of all the purchases directly to Ad Relief.
  • Get involved! Ad Relief is always in need of donations, event sponsors, and volunteers.
  • Help spread the word! The more people we can educate about Ad Relief, the more advocates we’ll have ready when a tragedy strikes. When you are going through the unimaginable, the last thing you want to do is ask for help. We want to make sure everyone knows who we are before they are in that situation.

Tags:  #MemberSpotlight  #thinkMembers  Ad Relief  Bryanna Goecke  Career Advice  Community  LA Advertising  Member Spotlight 

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Member Spotlight: Ed Chambliss, CEO, Phelps

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Photos: Don Lupo Photography

 

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

When I was seven years old, I visited my Uncle’s post-production studio. I was fascinated by how commercials were put together - all the tools and tricks that went into creating an ad. I wanted to use those tools to tell stories, which led me to my initial career as a copywriter. While working at BBDO, I taught a series of courses in creativity at The Portfolio Center and came to realize that while I was a good creative, I wasn’t a great one. What I was great at was brand and creative strategy. So I left copywriting and enrolled in the Masters of Integrated of Marketing Communication program at the University of Colorado in Boulder. When I graduated, Joe Phelps hired me to be a mid-level account guy. Over the last 18 years I’ve pitched and led accounts, and led the agency through a succession of roles – first as chief operating officer, then president and now CEO.

 

   

 

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

I’m on a quest. And have been for a most of my career. There just has to be a better way for companies to interact with customers. When two people have a conversation, everything is relatively straightforward. The conversation flows both ways. People talk. People listen. The conversation progresses and benefits both sides. But when a company tries to communicate as one entity, it’s a train wreck. Listening seems to be optional (or at least intermittent) and speaking only seems to clumsily advance the brand’s interests. So I wake up every day, knowing deep down inside that this can be fixed. It’s a big problem that clearly can’t be solved overnight. But I think we, as an industry, can do it to the benefit of everyone involved.

 

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned so far?

Customers are people. It sounds simple, but so many things our industry does completely ignore the fact that on the other end of our communications isn’t a “target” but an individual human being – a protagonist in their own narrative filled with pains, joys, drama and desires. We ignore that at our own peril.

 

What excites you most about this industry?

Thanks to technology, we’re entering an era where marketing can serve people, and we can establish authentic, equitable relationships between people and brands. As we continue to get more information about people, we come to understand how communications can support rather than interrupt their lives.

 

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

We’re on the road to either distinction or extinction, depending on the struggle between convenience and quality and how we use data as a result. If quality wins, advertising will become more relevant to people than ever, because we’ll mine data to understand individual needs and create brand conversations with meaning and utility. If convenience wins, we will become little more than technicians shoveling data around, helping our clients stalk prospects with no regard for what they want.

 

Why are you involved with ThinkLA?

Our business is so competitive. We’re constantly trying to edge each other out of the way so that we can win (or retain) clients. We need to remember that we’re also a community. It’s important and rewarding to take a moment every once in a while to enjoy each other’s company (and war stories) and help each other overcome shared challenges. Also, who doesn’t love AdJam?

 

What advice do you have for those just starting in advertising?

Learn the software. Learn to code. But don’t stop there. Learn to speak. Learn to write. Learn about people, particularly what cements our shared humanity. And learn about yourself. You’ll need all of those skills to succeed.

 

Any closing thoughts?

The ancient Greek philosopher Epictetus said something advertising needs to live by if we’re to earn a meaningful place in the emerging world: “We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak.

Tags:  #ThinkMembers  Advertising  CEO  Ed Chambliss  LA Advertising  Member  Phelps  PhelpsAdvertising 

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Super Bowl LII - ThinkLA Member Ads and Insights

Posted By Emily Hope, Monday, February 5, 2018

Every year, we remind Madison Ave. that the West Coast means business when it comes to Super Bowl advertising spends. Below is our annual list of #BigGame spots, promotions and insights that came from our corporate members. Enjoy! 

SUPERBOWL SPOTS

Saatchi & Saatchi | Toyota - Mobility Anthem

 

Saatchi & Saatchi | Toyota: One Team

 

Saatchi & Saatchi | Toyota, Good Odds

 

Saatchi & Saatchi | Tide, It's a Tide Ad

  

Saatchi & Saatchi | Tide, It's Another Tide Ad

 

Saatchi & Saatchi | Tide, It's Yet Another Tide Ad

 

Saatchi & Saatchi | Tide, It's Yet Another Tide Ad Again

 

Walton Isaacson | Lexus / Marvel Studios Black Panther

 

Amazon | Amazon Alexa

 

Amazon Prime Video | Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan 

 

David&Goliath | Kia

 

David&Goliath | Jack In The Box

 

Hulu | Hulu Castle Rock

 

Innocean USA | Hyundai Kona

 

SUPERBOWL INSIGHTS

Alphonso | Ad Insights Center

Alphonso tracked the performance of all Super Bowl LII ads in real time, with their Alphonso Ad Insights Center. Attribution reports for Super Bowl ads, using CPG sales data, credit card data, location data and tune-in data will be posted within three weeks.

 

Kantar Media | The Numbers

Kantar Media’s preliminary estimate of in-game ad expenditures for Super Bowl LII, subject to revision, is $414 million. This would be the second largest amount in history besides last year’s game, which was the first to run into overtime.

Read more: https://www.kantarmedia.com/us/thinking-and-resources/blog/super-bowl-lii-the-numbers

 

Verizon Media | Tests the Limits of 5G

Super Bowl LII was the backdrop for a quiet 5G proving ground, as Verizon (VZ) tested an in-stadium pre-commercial 5G network connection to demonstrate how massive speed and bandwidth can bring live video and virtual reality experiences to new levels.

Read more: https://seekingalpha.com/pr/17064954-shhh-verizon-network-engineers-quietly-worked-behind-scenes-super-bowl-lii-test-limits-5g

 

Jumpstart Automotive | Media Super Bowl Report


Jumpstart Automotive released its annual Super Bowl report, which reveals the auto brands that drove the greatest traffic increases across its portfolio of publishers. Super Bowl LII, which registered 103.4 million viewers, saw advertising from several car brands during pre-game, the halftime show, and the game itself, including Toyota, Kia, Hyundai, Lexus, Ram, Jeep, and Mercedes-Benz.

View the report: https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2018/02/06/1333882/0/en/Kia-Lexus-and-Jeep-See-Highest-Traffic-Lifts-During-Super-Bowl-LII.html

 

Tags:  #ThinkMembers  Advertising  Alphonso  Amazon  Corporate Members  D&G  David&Goliath  Hulu  Hyundai  Innocean  Jumpstart Auto  Kantar Media  Lexus  Los Angeles Advertising  Saatchi & Saatchi  SBLII  Super Bowl LII  Verizon Media  Walton Isaacson 

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Fireside Chats with Jun Group

Posted By Emily Hope, Monday, December 18, 2017

In partnership with Jun Group, we set out to find out what top marketers are doing to attract talent and stay ahead of the curve, win new business, and set Los Angeles apart.

 

Adam Tabachnikoff, Senior Vice President, Global Marketing, The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf

“The easy part and the fun part about being a CMO is doing videos, its going on photoshoots—but when I walk into my board meetings, what really becomes sexy is the analytics and the numbers. The prettiest POP (point of purchase display), the best social media, —whether its a JPEG or a short video—are fun to present, but what really goes well, is when we have the analytics and data to show what the ROI was...that we actually drove incremental traffic and profitable sales." 

 

Chris Athens: Associate Media Director, Maxus

“People are not necessarily only converting digitally; in fact, the majority of conversions happen on-air. Breaking down that conversion silo is something that we’ve been trying to tackle with certain partners. Understanding where people are watching, how they’re consuming [video content], and then trying that back to the ad exposure."

 

Lisa Nichols, Chief Data Officer, Partner, Bloom Ads Global Media Group

"Finding the right people is very challenging. Today, we look to people who have a coding background, people who have mathematical brain, people that understand statistical relevance. But on the other side, talent still must be creative.”

 

Claire Thompson: Senior Strategist, Vice Media

“We take a very hard line on what we feel is ‘crossing a line’ and making it unclear that something is an advertisement. If we weren’t being so protective of our brand and ensuring that we are not tricking our readers, then we lose integrity with our audience… which is precisely why we are successful and is why we are attractive to advertisers in the first place.”

 

Don Lupo: Director of Content and Marketing, ThinkLA

“What’s concerning is something that we call agency 3.0. Agencies have to be far more nimble than they were, they have to offer a full set of services and experiences, that maybe you [the agency] did not provide directly in the past. Digital strategists, social media strategists, information architecture and UX (user experience specialists) which is not always something that an agency hired for. The agency has evolved.”

 

Joey Adler: Chief Executive Officer, Carve Nutrition, Founder, Department of Good

"My motto is: I don’t want to do anything in business that doesn’t support the community. The Department of Good is that. It’s a platform, and it will be the first time I believe that a platform will work with small independent business (focusing on brick and mortar) in a collaborative way. We want to support the small independent brick and mortar store. We want to support community organizations. We want to support people with innovative ideas. And we want to support the consumer to have an experience and to be part of something [community focused]. And we have give back up and down the supply chain.”

 

Paul Pastor: Executive Vice President, Strategy, Revenue and Operations, Discovery Channel

“Pulling the entire story out of our consumer base across multiple platforms is not easy. What we’ve been able to do is work with our own first party data, with third party vendors, and then with the Nielsen’s and Comscores of the world to put together a comprehensive view of consumers at various stages across different platforms. This informs the content investment we make and how we think about the partnerships we have with advertisers.”

 

Stephanie Friend, Associate Integrated Media Director, Bloom Ads Global Media Group

“We’re making big movements forward to establish dashboards that link up to all of our digital partners and our DMP. We find the best way to attribute [business ROI] to each medium. We are also in the business of testing — i.e. just TV versus just radio, versus just digital, and showing how that really compares to a truly fully integrated campaign.”

Tags:  #ThinkMembers  Brand Marketers  Fireside Chats  Jun Group  LA Advertising  Marketing  Member Profiles  ThinkLA 

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Volunteer Spotlight: Derek Hand

Posted By Emily Hope, Thursday, December 14, 2017

Get to know Derek Hand, Strategist at Canvas Worldwide, Co-Chair of ThinkLA's Mentor Committee, and a member of ThinkLA's
Young Professionals Council. 



 

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road-map?
I started in broadcast as an assistant media buyer. This was a great opportunity for me to learn from veterans of the industry. Eventually, I jumped over to digital working on planning, investment, and ad ops. Currently, I’m focused mostly on strategy. I’ve had the good fortune to have touched on a variety of verticals including both entertainment and automotive allowing me visibility into varying styles of advertising. Looking forward to what the future brings!

What excites you most about this industry? 
The industry is constantly evolving, presenting new opportunities from a strategic standpoint. As new Adtech and Mar-tech flourish, the possibilities to develop new creative media executions and how to best measure them is very exciting.

 


 Photos // Martin Aranda Photography

Why are you involved with ThinkLA?
ThinkLA is a place of innovation, community, and opportunity. I’m constantly learning from my peers, and in turn, I hope to give something back to both my peers and the greater industry.

What’s the best advice you’d give to someone interested in a career in advertising? Are there any written materials you suggest to read?
Attend ThinkLA AdU classes, be open to trying different things, find a mentor, and most of all – jump in and absorb everything you can. Nothing compares to actually getting in there and doing the work. 

 

Tags:  #ThinkMembers  Canvas Worldwide  Derek Hand  Member Profiles  Strategist  ThinkLA Members  YPC2017 

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