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Member Spotlight: Carron Brown, VP, Account Director, The Integer Group

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, March 7, 2018


Photos: Don Lupo Photography

 

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

A dear friend at Leo Burnett encouraged me to get started in advertising. She was aware of my skillset and knew that my personality and expertise were a good fit for the advertising world. She was absolutely correct. It wasn’t until I began in advertising that I truly felt at home.

Prior to advertising, my background was in entertainment and technology. Therefore, I was able to make an immediate impact in my first agency role on the Universal Pictures account. This account brought all of my passions together under one roof. I was afforded the opportunity to combine my affinity for entertainment, multicultural marketing, media and content creation. Ever since, I’ve built my career with accounts that tap into my passion points and allow me to show up, each and every day, genuinely excited about the challenges and opportunities ahead.

I’ve recently joined the Omnicom family. I work on the AT&T account through the commerce agency, The Collective. In this role, I reside at the intersection of branding, selling, entertainment and technology. I felt that bringing the advertising experience full circle, and closing the loop at retail, was an important skill to add to my portfolio.

 

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

I stay motivated knowing that I’m assisting a brand in finding their authentic voice, and shaping that brand story in a way that connects to the target audience in a meaningful way.

My personal motto is derived from something Maya Angelou once said, “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” I apply that in everything I do, and I aim to move in a way that encourages others, and empowers them to become their best selves.


What excites you most about this industry?

This industry is full of unapologetic passion and energy, and that’s contagious. We have the power to shape the way people see themselves and their place in the world. When used for good, that power is magical.
 

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

The future belongs to the companies that stand for something, and that's exciting. There’s increasingly a price to be paid for neutrality, and this is forcing brands to find their voice, have a POV and move with intention.

In the next five years, agencies will be called upon for their strategic and cultural expertise, in equal proportion to their creative services.


What advice do you have for black advertising professionals that are beginning their career?

Embrace your empirical knowledge. The industry needs many different voices and experiences in order to offer clients well-rounded solutions. The industry is in desperate need of unique points of view. I would give that advise to any person starting out in advertising. Don’t allow your age or level of experience to shape your perception of your value. We’re in a business of culture, and an agency’s cultural currency is only as valuable as the sum experiences of its members. Your unique life experience is an asset. Treat it as such.

What should our industry be talking about in 2018?

In 2018, it’s time to officially acknowledge our new blended world as a reality, and not a niche market. While targeted marketing efforts are still very much needed, in order to ensure that we’re speaking with an audience, and not just at them; our definition of “general market” must quickly expand.


Any closing thoughts?

Be present. It’s all moving so fast.

Tags:  #MemberSpotlight  #ThinkDIG  #ThinkMembers  Career Advice  DIG 

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Celebrating the Women of ThinkLA

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, March 7, 2018

To celebrate International Women's Day, we've highlighted the women of ThinkLA - from our board member badasses to our smiling staffers. It is an honor to work with such brilliant, talented, and infinitely capable women.


 

"There has never been a more exceptional time to be a woman in our industry, in our city—for myriad reasons, and not all of them good.

This is the year women spoke up, fought back, rose to the top of every department and agency. We found courage in ourselves, our friends, our colleagues. We continued to support one another, across and within our companies, hopefully inspiring the next generation to be the strong, compassionate leaders we turned out to be. Sometimes we stumbled. We found an astonishing number of allies to lift us up.

There has never been a more exceptional time. Cheers to these exceptional women.” - Kristi VandenBosch, ThinkLA Executive Board Member, and Chief Digital Officer, MXM

 

 

Megan Amic, IDEA Council

Senior Director, Media, NBC Entertainment, Marketing and Digital

 

Katie Bakunas, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Senior Account Manager, The Trade Desk

 

Leisha Bereson, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

VP, Group Director, Programmatic Canvas Worldwide

 

Alexis Boerger, ThinkLA Board of Directors

VP, Medialink

 

Tenaya Bookout, Young Professionals Council

Account and Strategy Manager, Bradley and Montgomery

 

Sarah Ceglarski, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Partner, Chief Marketing Officer, Omelet

 

Olivia Christian

Event Coordinator, ThinkLA

 

Danielle CiapparaThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Manager, International Planning, Wavemaker 

 

Charlotte Cochrane, IDEA Council

EVP, Managing Director, Digital, Horizon Media 

 

Theresa Collins, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Director of PR, Wieden + Kennedy 

 

Chanel DeVetterThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Marketing Manager, FIDM

 

Serena Duff, ThinkLA Board of Directors

EVP, General Manager, Horizon

 

Susan Franceschini

Executive Director, ThinkLA

 

Andrea Green

Office Manager, ThinkLA

 

Brook Hauge, Young Professionals Council

Client and Strategy Supervisor, Canvas Worldwide

 

Emily Hope

Communications Manager, ThinkLA

 

Sara Hope Smith

Digital Designer, ThinkLA

   
 

Wanda Kato, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Managing Director, OMD

 

Jennifer Klawin, IDEA Council

SVP of Brand Partnerships, West Coast BuzzFeed

 

Myra Marayag, IDEA Council

VP of Sales, Defy Media

 

Jacqueline Melendez

Membership Coordinator, ThinkLA

 

Jasmin Mendoza

Design Intern, ThinkLA

 

Sara Morton, IDEA Council

Consultant

 

Cynthia Pena, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Account Executive, Marketing and Communications, Team One

 

Samantha Perlich, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Director of National Sales, GroundTruth

 

Elizabeth Primm, IDEA Council

Director, Twitter Client Solutions, Twitter

 

Kim Brown Robinson, IDEA Council

Consultant

 

Kendall Rouse, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Customer Success Associate, Blavity

 

Karin Schaer, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Chief Marketing Officer, The Firm

 

Linda Schwab

Director of Events and Sponsorship Director, ThinkLA

 

Lindsay Scoggins

Events Manager, ThinkLA

 

Laura Small, DIG

Vice President, Director of People, RPA

 

Lisa Solomon, IDEA Council 

Consultant 

 

 Lisa Tanner, IDEA Council

Senior Vice President, Group Account Director, RPA

 

Carol Terakawa, ThinkLA Board of Directors

SVP, Strategic Sales Development, Screenvision Media

 

Claire Thompson, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Sr. Strategist, Brand Connections, VICE Media

 

Kristi VandenBosch, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Chief Digital Officer, MXM

 

Liz WeinstenThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Marketing Associate, Gimbal 

 

Jana Wentz, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

VP, Account Director, RPA 

 

Autumn White, IDEA Council 

Head of Digital, West, OMD

 

Heidi Williams, ThinkLA Board of Directors

SVP, Associate Partner, Director of HR, Dailey

 

Roya Zand, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Media Supervisor, Essence Global

Tags:  #ThinkDIG  Diversity  ThinkLA Board  Women at Work 

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Global Wednesday: March

Posted By Emily Hope, Tuesday, March 6, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, March 13, 2018
It's big (ad) world, but we aim to make it feel even smaller by highlighting inventive, global ads, monthly, that break the mold from the mundane. To capture that global spirit, we will feature inspiration from outside of the U.S. and sometimes from brands that we've never even heard of!
 
ThinkLA couldn't be more grateful for Luis Camano, ThinkLA Board Member, award winning creative, and an expert in the field of Brand Activation, for being our Global Warrior and bringing these to our attention. We hope that Global Wednesdays inspires our members as much as it does us.

 

1. How do you translate KFC’s "Finger licking good” in Hong Kong? You don’t, you just show it… in a kinda weird way.

KFC Finger Lickin' Good Edible Nail Polish Case study from John Koay on Vimeo.

 

2. The Louvre has just opened a branch in Abu Dhabi. Worth seeing it. Also worth seeing is the way they promoted it to the public, utilizing “old” media vehicles like radio and billboards. Here’s the "Highway Gallery."

 

3. We know the French are experts when the topic of love comes up. For Valentine’s Day, this chain of French supermarkets confirmed it.

 

4. And finally, a teaser for all Westworld fans. An immersive experience about an immersive experience. To promote season 2, HBO will let fans travel to Sweetwater and explore the space in greater depth. At SXSW this month.

Tags:  Global Ads  Global Wednesday  International Advertising  Luis Camano 

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Spotlight: Bryanna Goecke, Ad Relief President, and Account Executive at Us Weekly

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, February 28, 2018


Photos: Don Lupo Photography

 

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

I am slightly embarrassed to admit that I completely fell into the world of advertising. Growing up in Colorado, I had no idea that there was an entire industry dedicated to advertising, much less that it would be the perfect fit for me. I’ve always been an extrovert and enjoyed interacting with new people, and I’ve always been intrigued by the human psyche and knowing what makes people tick. From about the time I was in middle school, I was convinced I wanted to be a criminal profiler for the FBI; I was reading books like John Douglass’ Mindhunter about 20 years before Netflix made it cool. I was absolutely fascinated by the concept that you could study someone’s personality and past behavior to predict their future actions. I eventually decided I was not cut out for law enforcement. I had a Bachelor’s degree with a double-major in Psychology and Sociology, yet only a vague career goal of finding a niche where I could apply my understanding of human behavior and love for working with people.

During this time, I had also been managing a movie theatre to get through school. Right after graduation, one of my old co-workers approached me about coming to work with him as a Sales Planner at NCM Media Networks, which is the company that did all the in-theatre advertising at my theatre. Although I honestly had no idea what a planner was, I already knew the company was fantastic from working with them during my theatre days, so I jumped headfirst into the role. As soon as I started, I fell in love with the advertising world. I immediately knew that my end goal was to work in Advertising Sales. It was the absolute perfect fit—who knew there was a job completely dedicated to interacting with people and homing in on consumers’ behaviors to drive product sales?! I was lucky to work at a company where my management team was really vested in the success of their employees and helped foster our goals. They knew my passion was in sales so they helped me transfer to the LA Sales office to dive into the market.

It’s always been important to me to think one step ahead of my career path to create direct, actionable steps to get where I want to go. Just like I knew I needed to move to LA when I was working in Colorado, I already knew I wanted to develop my sales knowledge by working at Turner during the time I was at NCM. I actively networked and prepared for that role so I was ready when a position opened up. Similarly, while I was developing my skills as a planner, I was determined to move into a Digital Sales role with a reputable, trusted brand like Us Weekly. I took digital training courses, met people in the digital realm, and attended as many networking events as I could to help prepare me for my current role.

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

I’m a firm believer that the best motivation always intrinsically comes from within. I constantly challenge myself to learn something new, improve my current skills, or do something that terrifies me until I’ve mastered it enough to lose the fear. I will never be a finished product; I know I can’t be complacent because everything I struggle through now will help me prepare for the road ahead.

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned so far?

Don’t be afraid to be your awesome, crazy, authentic self. When I was first contemplating moving into advertising sales, I had this picture in my head of a slimy cars salesman who would say anything to drive business. I knew I couldn’t be that person, and questioned if I had what it took to succeed in sales. I have no poker face. I can’t even tell a white lie to my dog. I decided to embrace my own style and hope for the best. I am so thankful that I did because I quickly learned that you get further by letting people see your quirky, unique personality than by trying to fit yourself into a pre-set mold. I think my candidness has played a pivotal role in helping me build long-lasting, trusting relationships that allow me to be successful in my career.

 What excites you most about this industry?

I love that the industry is constantly changing. Every day is a new adventure and it’s so exciting to be a part of the evolution. I remember when I was first starting out in advertising over a decade ago, I was tasked with helping our company figure out how to sell digital as a brand new product. To this day I think we are still being tasked with this same challenge of changing our products and sales models to keep up with the latest offerings. It keeps you on your toes and makes things interesting.

 What advice do you have for those just starting in advertising? Take some time to really think about your career path and where you would like to be five years from now, 10 years from now, and 20 years from now. Plan out actionable steps. Once you know what you want, tell everyone about it. If you have goals and are ready to work hard to get there, people will support you. We are so lucky to be a part of the LA advertising community—I have seen time and time again that it is one big family where everyone wants to help raise each other up.

None of the opportunities I’ve had in my career would have been there without the strong support net of my industry family at NCM, Turner, and Ad Relief. When I first started out in advertising, they gave me projects to help teach me how to be a good seller, they introduced me to people who worked at the companies they knew I wanted to work at, and they always went to bat for me when it was time to move to the next position. The relationships you make are everything.

With that said, you also need to be ready to hustle. Take an active role in your own success. Say yes to every project that comes across your desk, even if it will require long hours and may fall way out of your comfort zone. Every assignment is an opportunity to learn something new and become a stronger asset.

Last but not least, put yourself out there. Meet as many people as you can. Go to every ThinkLA and Ad Relief event that you can possibly squeeze in. Any time you are invited to go out with co-workers or clients, say yes. This is a small community and you will be working with the same people for years to come, so make connections. Jump out of your comfort zone and say hi to a stranger.

How did you get started with Ad Relief?

When I first moved to LA, one of my co-workers invited me to go to the annual Ad Relief Movie Night. At the time I didn’t fully grasp what the organization was all about. I thought it was just another opportunity to go hang out with people in the advertising industry. Once I learned more about the charity, how events like the Movie Night and November Luncheon raise money for people in our advertising community who are going through a life crisis, I knew I wanted to become more involved. I’ve now been a part of the organization for about four years and am honored to have been inaugurated as President this year.

The events are always the fun part, but by far the most demanding and rewarding part of Ad Relief is acting as a case worker on the board to help our friends, co-workers, and colleagues who are going through difficult times. While we keep everything strictly confidential to protect the people we help, at any given time we may be assisting anywhere from one to dozens of fellow colleagues in the LA advertising community. No two cases are alike—we’ve provided support for everything from cancer treatments, to homes burning down, to industry vets who suddenly find themselves homeless and unemployed with a growing pile of medical bills. It is one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever been a part of and I am so thankful that my co-worker brought me to that first event.

 What does 2018 hold for you, and for Ad Relief?

This is already looking to be a very busy year for Ad Relief. Unfortunately, the constant changes in the advertising landscape have pushed more people into hard times than ever before. We are constantly working to grow the organization to support the increased need we are seeing from the community. We are also very excited to welcome several new board members this year! In partnership with the new members, we are working hard to raise awareness for Ad Relief across all sectors of the advertising community, from digital to radio, as well as brainstorm some fun new events.

 Any closing thoughts?

It would only be right to give a quick shout out to ThinkLA. You have played such a big part in my career development, and I am so thankful that you are here to support me and the rest of the LA advertising community! If anyone reading this has not yet gone to a ThinkLA event, you definitely need to make it a priority!

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Are you interested in supporting Ad Relief

  • You can support the Ad Relief mission by attending their events throughout the year. The first event of 2018 is Bubbles & Brews on March 8 at OMD/Chiat. Considering the open bar, food, and games are all included in the $50 ticket price, it’s a great deal, and they always have an amazing turnout.
  • When shopping on Amazon, use smile.amazon.com and select “Advertising Industry Emergency Fund” from the list of charities. By doing this, Amazon donates 0.05% of all the purchases directly to Ad Relief.
  • Get involved! Ad Relief is always in need of donations, event sponsors, and volunteers.
  • Help spread the word! The more people we can educate about Ad Relief, the more advocates we’ll have ready when a tragedy strikes. When you are going through the unimaginable, the last thing you want to do is ask for help. We want to make sure everyone knows who we are before they are in that situation.

Tags:  #MemberSpotlight  #thinkMembers  Ad Relief  Bryanna Goecke  Career Advice  Community  LA Advertising  Member Spotlight 

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Takeaways from DIG Outreach Event: "Elevate your Mind."

Posted By Emily Hope, Tuesday, February 27, 2018

ThinkLA's DIG Committee was proud to participate in an event that inspired African American high school students from across Los Angeles titled "Black Excellence Expo: Elevate your Mind."

The event was a combined effort from 18 committed, LA area schools, with panelists across many different fields: doctors, lawyers, advertisers, athletes, activists, fashion and entertainment industries. The keynote speaker was Robert Townsend, actor, comedian, director, and writer, and CEO of Townsend Entertainment.

 

 

The ongoing theme throughout the event was staying true to who you are, embracing your true self, and overall ethnic pride. Each speaker shared their personal journey and different struggles along their career path that have led them to where there are today.

 

 

Samantha Hawkins, Supervisor, Community Management at RPA, and DIG committee member, spoke on a panel about the importance of public service and had these takeaways from the event:

"I may not be in public service per se, but as advertisers we have a responsibility to produce work that is inclusive and represents the diversity of the people we reach with our ads every day. Advertising is everywhere. People like my fellow panelists are not represented in mainstream advertising, and we can change that so young people are accustomed to seeing people that look like them depicted in positions of power and influence in our marketing. So they know those types of careers and lifestyles are not just held exclusively for a certain type of person who looks a certain way, but that they too have the potential to achieve what they want in life. The best way of ensuring that shift, is to hire more people of color and with diverse backgrounds into roles in advertising and marketing." 

 

   
   

 

 MEMORABLE TAKEAWAYS

  • African Americans are going to have to work harder. Factor that into the equation and prepare for it."
  • "When they doubt your ability, use that as fuel to your flame: Prove them wrong, and get used to doing that again and again." - Mel Carlisle, Managing Director, Oaktree Capital Management
  • Everyone applying wants the job, but who has a passion for it? Stand out from the competition by being able to articulate why you love it.
  • Connect with real people outside of your job. Do things that put you in contact with the real world not just to round out your résumé, but to keep you grounded and rooted in helping others.

 

Tags:  #ThinkDIG  Diversity  entertainment  student outreach 

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Member Spotlight: Clarissa Garrett, Senior Art Producer, RPA

Posted By Emily Hope, Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Photos: Don Lupo Photography

 

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

I was about 5 years old when I began performing my favorite ad jingle for my mother and her friends at their Saturday night hangouts. I’d sneak in the kitchen, steal a frying pan and start singing “I can bring home the bacon…fry it up in a pan”! This circa 1980 Enjoli perfume commercial reenactment always resulted in riotous laughter to my satisfaction.

Completely unaware that Advertising was a viable career option, I applied to Syracuse Universities S.I Newhouse School of public communications out of high school, in hopes of becoming the next Oprah. It only took 3 weeks of a first-year broadcast journalism class to confirm that the “News” was not my passion. I switched to the Advertising track and consumed all aspects of the discipline.

After graduation, I had no idea how to land a job in the field so I researched mentoring programs. [ThinkLA's] Minority Advertising Training program (MAT) helped me to land an internship at Saatchi & Saatchi where I partnered with an amazing mentor. With her help, I found the Art Production department which was a creative mix of photography, project management and world travel!

After a decade working Automotive accounts and then a few years freelancing, I landed my dream job working on the Apple account. With a deep love for Apple products at an intensely creative agency, I proudly helped to launch the iPad and was one of the Senior producers for the Shot on iPhone campaign. I’m now happily working on Honda on a brand I both love and respect at an agency whose mission is to put its people first (RPA).

 

     

 

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

“Just keep singing”… My love for music and performing keeps me motivated. Learning, writing, performing and creating music cleanses my soul! Even just listening to music of all genres calms my mind. It’s sort of prophetic in the way that it becomes the window into what is happening in culture and in our collective consciousness. When I began writing my own music, it gave me a voice and allowed me to live life more “woke” and happy. Music is therapy and it sparks creativity. Everyone should have something in their lives that fills their heart in this way. What excites you most about this industry? It’s exciting because it’s always evolving and requires its members to evolve as well. You can’t hate change and be successful in this business. Advertising reflects and informs culture and so we have to watch it and live it and make sure we are hiring diverse cultural influencers and experts so that our voice remains relevant and our ideas stay fresh.

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

 You only have to watch a couple of Black Mirror episodes to know we are only at the beginning of the digital media evolution. My kids aren’t into social media at all, they are busy building their own worlds in Minecraft! Ads are becoming product placements in our digital lives and that is probably only going to go to deeper more savvy levels.

What advice do you have for black advertising professionals that are beginning their career?

 Find an amazing mentor! Please note, this person does not necessarily need to look like you! If you find someone you admire, just start asking questions. See if they are willing to make an investment in your dream by sharing what they’ve learned. I’ve had incredible mentors through the years at every level in my career from diverse backgrounds and each enriched my life and path in profound ways.

What should our industry be talking about in 2018?

As advertisers I think we have the power to change the narrative in culture. I believe we should be putting out messages of unity and continue to focus on ending divisiveness in the world.

In the summer of 2016, I was one of the producers on an Apple spot called “The Human Family” which celebrated global diversity and was narrated by the late poet laureate Maya Angelou. It was released at a time when our country needed the message. And yes, it sold products but it also sold hope, unity and the idea that we are all “more alike, than we are unalike”.

Any closing thoughts?

Just keep singing…

Tags:  #ThinkDIG  Art Producer  Career Advice  Creatives  Diversity  Member Spotlight  RPA 

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Member Spotlight: Ed Chambliss, CEO, Phelps

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Photos: Don Lupo Photography

 

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

When I was seven years old, I visited my Uncle’s post-production studio. I was fascinated by how commercials were put together - all the tools and tricks that went into creating an ad. I wanted to use those tools to tell stories, which led me to my initial career as a copywriter. While working at BBDO, I taught a series of courses in creativity at The Portfolio Center and came to realize that while I was a good creative, I wasn’t a great one. What I was great at was brand and creative strategy. So I left copywriting and enrolled in the Masters of Integrated of Marketing Communication program at the University of Colorado in Boulder. When I graduated, Joe Phelps hired me to be a mid-level account guy. Over the last 18 years I’ve pitched and led accounts, and led the agency through a succession of roles – first as chief operating officer, then president and now CEO.

 

   

 

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

I’m on a quest. And have been for a most of my career. There just has to be a better way for companies to interact with customers. When two people have a conversation, everything is relatively straightforward. The conversation flows both ways. People talk. People listen. The conversation progresses and benefits both sides. But when a company tries to communicate as one entity, it’s a train wreck. Listening seems to be optional (or at least intermittent) and speaking only seems to clumsily advance the brand’s interests. So I wake up every day, knowing deep down inside that this can be fixed. It’s a big problem that clearly can’t be solved overnight. But I think we, as an industry, can do it to the benefit of everyone involved.

 

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned so far?

Customers are people. It sounds simple, but so many things our industry does completely ignore the fact that on the other end of our communications isn’t a “target” but an individual human being – a protagonist in their own narrative filled with pains, joys, drama and desires. We ignore that at our own peril.

 

What excites you most about this industry?

Thanks to technology, we’re entering an era where marketing can serve people, and we can establish authentic, equitable relationships between people and brands. As we continue to get more information about people, we come to understand how communications can support rather than interrupt their lives.

 

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

We’re on the road to either distinction or extinction, depending on the struggle between convenience and quality and how we use data as a result. If quality wins, advertising will become more relevant to people than ever, because we’ll mine data to understand individual needs and create brand conversations with meaning and utility. If convenience wins, we will become little more than technicians shoveling data around, helping our clients stalk prospects with no regard for what they want.

 

Why are you involved with ThinkLA?

Our business is so competitive. We’re constantly trying to edge each other out of the way so that we can win (or retain) clients. We need to remember that we’re also a community. It’s important and rewarding to take a moment every once in a while to enjoy each other’s company (and war stories) and help each other overcome shared challenges. Also, who doesn’t love AdJam?

 

What advice do you have for those just starting in advertising?

Learn the software. Learn to code. But don’t stop there. Learn to speak. Learn to write. Learn about people, particularly what cements our shared humanity. And learn about yourself. You’ll need all of those skills to succeed.

 

Any closing thoughts?

The ancient Greek philosopher Epictetus said something advertising needs to live by if we’re to earn a meaningful place in the emerging world: “We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak.

Tags:  #ThinkMembers  Advertising  CEO  Ed Chambliss  LA Advertising  Member  Phelps  PhelpsAdvertising 

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Global Wednesday: February

Posted By Emily Hope, Thursday, February 8, 2018
It's big (ad) world, but we aim to make it feel even smaller by highlighting inventive, global ads, monthly, that are breaking the mold from the mundane. To capture that global spirit, we will feature inspiration from outside of the U.S. and sometimes from brands that we've never even heard of!
 
These international ads are brought to you by Luis Camano, an award winning creative and an expert in the field of Brand Activation. 

 

1. Toblerone/China, found a fun and very inventive way to sell more chocolate. A lot more chocolate.

Enjoy this playful video, minus the hideous background track. 

2. I don’t know about you, but I’ve always wanted to blow up my cable bill. Well, now thanks to the folks at Claro Cable/Colombia, you can! 

 

3. Finally, the Quebec Magic Festival delivered a few surprises on the streets of Quebec. Here are a couple of them: 

 

 

 

Tags:  Global Ads  Global Wednesday  International Advertising  Luis Camano 

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Super Bowl LII - ThinkLA Member Ads and Insights

Posted By Emily Hope, Monday, February 5, 2018

Every year, we remind Madison Ave. that the West Coast means business when it comes to Super Bowl advertising spends. Below is our annual list of #BigGame spots, promotions and insights that came from our corporate members. Enjoy! 

SUPERBOWL SPOTS

Saatchi & Saatchi | Toyota - Mobility Anthem

 

Saatchi & Saatchi | Toyota: One Team

 

Saatchi & Saatchi | Toyota, Good Odds

 

Saatchi & Saatchi | Tide, It's a Tide Ad

  

Saatchi & Saatchi | Tide, It's Another Tide Ad

 

Saatchi & Saatchi | Tide, It's Yet Another Tide Ad

 

Saatchi & Saatchi | Tide, It's Yet Another Tide Ad Again

 

Walton Isaacson | Lexus / Marvel Studios Black Panther

 

Amazon | Amazon Alexa

 

Amazon Prime Video | Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan 

 

David&Goliath | Kia

 

David&Goliath | Jack In The Box

 

Hulu | Hulu Castle Rock

 

Innocean USA | Hyundai Kona

 

SUPERBOWL INSIGHTS

Alphonso | Ad Insights Center

Alphonso tracked the performance of all Super Bowl LII ads in real time, with their Alphonso Ad Insights Center. Attribution reports for Super Bowl ads, using CPG sales data, credit card data, location data and tune-in data will be posted within three weeks.

 

Kantar Media | The Numbers

Kantar Media’s preliminary estimate of in-game ad expenditures for Super Bowl LII, subject to revision, is $414 million. This would be the second largest amount in history besides last year’s game, which was the first to run into overtime.

Read more: https://www.kantarmedia.com/us/thinking-and-resources/blog/super-bowl-lii-the-numbers

 

Verizon Media | Tests the Limits of 5G

Super Bowl LII was the backdrop for a quiet 5G proving ground, as Verizon (VZ) tested an in-stadium pre-commercial 5G network connection to demonstrate how massive speed and bandwidth can bring live video and virtual reality experiences to new levels.

Read more: https://seekingalpha.com/pr/17064954-shhh-verizon-network-engineers-quietly-worked-behind-scenes-super-bowl-lii-test-limits-5g

 

Jumpstart Automotive | Media Super Bowl Report


Jumpstart Automotive released its annual Super Bowl report, which reveals the auto brands that drove the greatest traffic increases across its portfolio of publishers. Super Bowl LII, which registered 103.4 million viewers, saw advertising from several car brands during pre-game, the halftime show, and the game itself, including Toyota, Kia, Hyundai, Lexus, Ram, Jeep, and Mercedes-Benz.

View the report: https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2018/02/06/1333882/0/en/Kia-Lexus-and-Jeep-See-Highest-Traffic-Lifts-During-Super-Bowl-LII.html

 

Tags:  #ThinkMembers  Advertising  Alphonso  Amazon  Corporate Members  D&G  David&Goliath  Hulu  Hyundai  Innocean  Jumpstart Auto  Kantar Media  Lexus  Los Angeles Advertising  Saatchi & Saatchi  SBLII  Super Bowl LII  Verizon Media  Walton Isaacson 

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Member Spotlight: Bupendra Ram

Posted By Emily Hope, Tuesday, January 30, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, February 6, 2018

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

Ethnically, I am Indian, but I was born in the Fiji Islands. I came to the U.S. when I was two years old when my family fled Fiji because of a political coup. We got a tourist visa to enter the U.S. Before we left, we met a man who was charging people $10,000 for an opportunity to get a green card as soon as we entered the U.S.

Upon our arrival in the U.S., we were presented with a green card. By the time we realized it was a hoax, we had overstayed and became undocumented. At the age of 23, I became Undocumented and Unafraid, and Queer and Unashamed. At this time, I joined passionate and resilient people to fight for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) and help people understand that immigration is a global issue and not just for people south of our border.

In 2014, as a strong and unified community, we helped the Obama administration do the right thing by partnering with hundreds of lawyers to provide him with the legal groundings to provide administrative relief to a category of undocumented youth.

 

Don Lupo Photography

 

As a recipient of DACA, my career in Human Resources has been relatively short but full of adventure and growth.

When I received DACA, I started to think about the opportunities that were not previously available or open to me. As a natural community builder and networker, I reached out to people and conducted informational interviews. I quickly learned that Human Resources would be the perfect blend of my love for business and people. In addition, I would be able to take my learnings back to my respective communities in two ways: 

  • I would learn how to support people from disadvantaged background with career planning, structuring and formatting their resume, branding themselves, and improving their interviewing skills;
  • I would learn the how to help others like me gain access to opportunities not always open to people with my experience or those who look like me.

The overall goal would be to become a Diversity and Inclusion practitioner to aggressively impact corporate culture.

Three years ago, I accepted an internship that would give me a broad understanding of Human Resources and gain practical experience. After outgrowing that role, I found an amazing opportunity as a Human Resources Coordinator at my first advertising agency, Hawthorne. I loved working with some of the most passionate and dedicated people in the industry. I directly impacted Hawthorne’s culture by helping them create a culture of trust and accountability. I loved helping their agency grow and be a place where people loved waking up and going to.

A year later, I was offered an opportunity to join Innocean USA with more responsibilities and an opportunity to be a part of a dynamic group of HR professionals. I was able to quickly learn more HR skills and dive into areas of HR that I am passionate about – diversity and Inclusion, employee relations, recruiting, and change management. Currently, through sheer determination, I am working in a field that I’m passionate about and love: Diversity and Inclusion at Live Nation as a Diversity and Inclusion Coordinator.

 

 

What (who) keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

My mom keeps me motivated. She continues to sacrifice so much so that I can have the experiences and opportunities that I am having. She left Fiji to travel to a place she had no idea about, had the courage to leave her abusive husband, and thrive when all the odds were against her.

Personal motto: “Why not?” I have always been told that I cannot achieve my goals because I am either undocumented, queer, a person of color, or an array of other reasons. I think sometimes we hold ourselves back because of our own subjugation and what we think is “normal.” I always try to figure out a way around challenges and push boundaries as much as I can.

 

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned so far?

I have learned that mistakes are your best friend. They help you learn and get better at what you do. It shows that you are in the arena and fighting to succeed. I have just learned how to be accountable for my mistakes, learn from them, and move on.

 

What excites you most about this industry?

Simply, it's the people. I think that marketing, advertising, and entertainment attract some of the most amazing and diverse people. Everyone is so passionate about what they do and creative that it makes work fun. Also, each day is so different that it forces you to find creative solutions to business challenges.

 

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

The industry is molding to adapt to the changing demographics of people within the United States and abroad. People are rejecting binaries, labels, and identities that pigeonhole them. The blanketed approach to sell or entertain generalized demographics is not going to work.

Over the next five years, I think that the industry will be trying to understand how they can cater to this new demographic and rebrand themselves. For example, so many women are telling their #MeToo story and some are taking it a step further to make sure that we are changing who we are as a society and industry. We are going to have to move forward together and embrace the differences that make us unique and who we are. People want organization to reflect their values and the diversity that they see around them.

 

Why are you involved with ThinkLA?

I love ThinkLA and value their collaborative frame of connecting advertising agencies and supplying them with tools to be successful. I have been working with them for over a year through their Diversity, Inclusion, and Gender (DIG) initiative to help create tools and resources for our industry and highlighting opportunities related to diversity, inclusion, and gender for our industry, and allowing us to harness the power of our unique backgrounds to the greater good.

 

What advice do you have for those just starting in advertising?

Network and let people know what you are passionate about. Since I started a career in HR, I went to most networking events and met as many people as I could. During every interaction, I found a way to tell everyone and anyone that would hear me that I want to practice diversity and inclusion. The industry is very small, everyone knows each other, and most people are open to mentoring and supporting you.

 

In Adobe's recent "Creativity’s Diversity Disconnect" study, which highlighted diversity issues in the advertising industry, 54% responded that the industry was “getting better compared to five years ago,” while 7% actually said it was getting worse. And a resounding number of minorities described lack of access and seeing themselves reflected in the workplace. As a member of ThinkLA’s DIG initiative, what are your thoughts on these findings? How can the industry improve?

I am not completely surprised by the results. There has been a shift to address issues around diversity, but more work needs to be done around inclusion. Diversity needs to be done in an authentic way without ignoring the intersectionality of individuals with the support of people from dominant groups. Diversity impacts all of us and everyone needs to be involved to address these issues within their respective organization. I wholeheartedly believe that – together – we can get to a place where people can bring their full selves to the workplace.

 

Any closing thoughts?

Be yourself – your whole self – your authentic self. It makes everything so much easier.

 

 

Tags:  #ThinkDIG  Advertising  Bupendra Ram  Career Advice  DACA  Diversity  Diversity in Advertising  Immigration  Innocean  Live Nation  Member Spotlight 

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