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Member Spotlight: Pete Favat, North American Chief Creative Officer, Deutsch

Posted By Emily Hope, Tuesday, April 3, 2018

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

It started in grade school. I started drawing stuff and became the go-to-guy for posters: sports, proms, yearbooks, anything. When I was 14, I was designing restaurant menus. People came to me for marketing because I drew all the time.

My road map has been to go with my gut. I was a CCO at 29. I mean, it was my own company, but I was running Converse.

How I got to Deutsch is really interesting and unplanned. Honestly, there are many times I have thought about leaving the industry and then something happens and I stay. I realized that the job doesn’t always need to be the one you thought it was. You can create your own. You can make docu-films or create an art show to help homeless people, like what we did with 100 Pieces. I have been able to use this job to do other things that satisfy my creative needs. What keeps me in advertising right now is that no one knows where the business is going and it is exciting. It keeps me young. The one thing I do know is that doing good is a passion.

Once, a reporter referred to me as a bonafide expert in advertising. If I’m ever an expert in anything, it’s time to quit.

 


Photo courtesy of Deutsch

 

What keeps you motivated?

If I’m not making something it’s because I died.

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned so far?

We can use our creative talents to make the world better. Sometimes people look down on advertising but what they don’t realize is that we have the ability to creatively move humanity forward. Advertising is starting to get a whiff of that and award it.

What excites you most about this industry?

The opportunity to help change the world with our creativity. We can partner with corporations to make the world better. And at the end of the day, that is what consumers want in 2018.

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

Brands are starting to understand that being a purpose-driven company and putting the good back into humanity is the currency of the future. People will buy things based on their emotional attachment to the way a company behaves. With so much competition, all product is parody. You create a product and in two weeks, you’ll have the same product made by someone else. People will buy with their hearts.

What advice do you have for those just starting in advertising?

“Hate something, change something.” Taken from Honda’s 2004 “Grrr” campaign. Advertising is rapidly changing into something else. And if you don’t like it, you’re probably a good candidate to change it from the inside.

What does 2018 hold for you, and for Deutsch?

That’s the beauty: I have no idea and a ton of ideas. We just start trying things and experimenting. If you don’t, you’ll sink. But to start, let’s make sure we’re doing right by our people and creating a culture where they feel safe. That’s how great work gets made.

Any closing thoughts for the ThinkLA community?

L.A. is at an inflection point that I’ve never before seen in my career. I’ve worked in London, Boston, Sweden, China, and all over the U.S. and I have never seen the collision of creativity and the fusion of film, music, and entertainment. The only thing missing is fashion. L.A. doesn’t get any credit for fashion. Every day, I think this is the best time and place to be in the ad business. L.A. has a ton of opportunity. Relish it. If you’re a creative person, you can do anything you want. The world is wide open. You have just as much of a chance as the next person.

 

 

Tags:  #MemberSpotlight  #ThinkMembers  Deutsch  Los Angeles 

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Member Spotlight: Samantha Hawkins, Supervisor, Community Management, RPA

Posted By Emily Hope, Monday, March 26, 2018

"I was lucky enough to be Sam’s Mentor through ThinkLA’s Mentorship program and I fell in love with her immediately; she is so powerful, smart, kind, dynamic, understanding, AMAZING. Her desire to grow and learn from everyone around her is infectious – to progress not just for progression’s sake, but to expand and learn about everything around her. I so value our time together and our friendship moving forward!" - Leisha Bereson, VP, Group Director, Programmatic, Canvas Worldwide 

 


Photos: Don Lupo Photography

 

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

I was a Business Marketing major in college, I was active in extracurriculars like sports, but also within the business department. Because I did two sports year-round, I didn’t have a lot of time to get real-world experience with internships until around my senior year. So I supplemented my course work with things like clubs, organizing local business owner speaking events, competing on the business presentations team, etc.

I eventually did get an internship where I was the Public Relations and Marketing intern for a fashion brand that was new to the West Coast and was trying to get more awareness of its denim line. I did things like compile press clippings from magazines, ship samples to Nylon and TeenVogue for their photoshoots, reach out to local bloggers for events we hosted. It was a lot of fun that was formative for me early on.

Then I got into my first real corporate job in Orange County in the automotive industry. I knew nothing about cars but Kelley Blue Book took me in as a Public Relations Coordinator. It was a temp position that eventually lead to a full-time role as a Marketing Coordinator. From there, I worked my way through the lower ranks of Marketing Specialists and then Associate Marketing Manager.

I learned a lot during those years, wearing a lot of hats in maintaining my team’s media and production budgets, learning to write effective briefs, managing our social media community and the content development process. I also learned a lot working with our media and creative agencies. I loved that the people were authentic, personable but had so much expertise in their fields.

I decided it was time for me to join the agency side so that I could learn from these amazing experts by working with them, and here I am at RPA!

 

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

I’m motivated by learning, growing, and helping others learn and grow. We should never lose a student mentality; we should always be learning. And at the same time, if we can each teach one another, we learn even more ourselves and we share that knowledge to help others grow. Let's elevate one another.

What excites you most about this industry?

The fast pace and changing landscapes that always keep me on my toes. I love challenges and collaboration, so this is a great industry for that!

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

As the content bubble begins to burst, we’ll leave the days of viral video, click bait, and surface-level content that is stimulating but not valuable. The pendulum is swinging toward advertising and marketing that is both valuable in content -- what that content contributes to the daily lives of people -- and also that puts the values of people and brands front and center: humanitarian values, societal values, equality, etc.

Authenticity, transparency, and equality take center stage. I also think we’ll see traditional continue to emerge in new forms. For example, the changing landscape of digital video and original programming and that shift from TV: what’s old is new again, just in slightly different formats and spaces.

What advice do you have for black advertising professionals who are beginning their career?

Stay hungry! Hungry to learn and hungry to push for growth. Don’t expect to do the bare minimum and get more opportunity or to get meaning from your job; you have to dig deeper. Learn as much as you can and always challenge yourself, reach higher... and once you’ve achieved that, reach even higher again and again.

Make sure you give back, mentor someone, be someone’s role model, help bring someone up the ladder as you go, whether you had someone to do the same for you or not, again we need to lift each other up. Be yourself and have fun with it, surround yourself with people that contribute to your happiness and positivity; don’t feel you have to change yourself just to get by.

What should our industry be talking about in 2018?

We should be talking about what we’re actually doing to increase diversity and inclusivity within our industry, within our agencies, in the work we do for clients. Let’s talk about what we’re actually doing about it. How is it working? How are we measuring success? Let’s share best practices and learnings.

It’s 2018. We know the realities of this issue, so it’s time to show action and celebrate those that are doing it well.

Tags:  #MemberSpotlight  #ThinkDIG  Diversity  Diversity in Advertising  RPA  Social Media 

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Pose&Focus: Women In Advertising

Posted By Emily Hope, Monday, March 26, 2018

Earlier this year, we were thrilled to come across an ultra-fresh Instagram feed: @lin_marty, Linda (Lin) Marty's photography page. The instagram feed is beautifully designed, screams BOSS LADY, and has beautiful, bohemian portraits of many our ad friends. After a bit of research, we were even more elated to learn the message behind these gorgeous images.

Pose&Focus: Women In Advertising is Lin's personal passion project, dedicated to highlighting women in the advertising industry through interviews and creative expression. The imagery is a creative portrayal of who they are beyond the corporate meetings, events, and brands they work with. Their stories will be honest, comical and informative that look to inspire all female professionals within the industry to thrive.

"Having been in the business for over a decade, I found it very important for women (and men) to support female leadership in our community and industry," says Lin. "Especially with our current political climate, this mission is more important to me than ever before. I want our female readers to know when they come here they will get solid advice and actionable steps that they can use to elevate their own careers."

 

 

Photos: Lin Marty Photography

View the entire series at linmartyphotography.com. Nominations for Pose&Focus Vol. 3 are open until April 2. Nominations must be female, located in Los Angeles, and currently work in the advertising industry (agency, sales, ad tech, production, etc.) with at least three years of experience. Contact Lin for more details. 

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About Linda: Linda is founder, creative director, and photographer of Lin Marty Photography. She is dedicated to supporting influencers, creative entrepreneurs, and boutique businesses to discover, define, and elevate their digital brand identity through beautiful and professional portrait and product photography. Prior to becoming a photographer, Linda worked in advertising, most recently at Canvas Worldwide as VP, Director, Digital Investment.

The series is supported by makeup artist, Julia Alexander, and body paint artist, Scott Richards.

Tags:  #ThinkDIG  Lin Marty  Pose&Focus  Women at Work  Women in Advertising 

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Spotlight: Shari Holly, Program Director, PIPELINES

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, March 21, 2018

When we made the call for our Women of Color in Advertising list,  we were thrilled to be introduced to a true champion of diversity and inclusion: Shari Holly. Shari is the Program Manager for PIPELINES at PRETTYBIRD, a non-profit aiming to close the access and opportunity gap by connecting underrepresented talent directly to opportunities and programs in tech and creative industries through a mobile app and series of engaging programs.

 


Photos: Don Lupo Photography


How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

My career road map is rather unconventional. Growing up in Detroit, at the time there weren’t many other black women pursuing creative careers, starting businesses, or creating non-traditional methods for success. There was a stigma (which is what I was taught) to find a stable and secure job (government, lawyer, teacher doctor), climb the corporate ladder, and retire with a sweet pension: the good ole’ American dream. I knew I was born a creative, but you really don’t know what you don’t know, and furthermore, without much access or role models, pursuing creative careers seems rather far-fetched in a sense.

I moved to Kalamazoo (yes, it’s a real city), graduated from college with a degree in Business and Spanish, and formed the idea along the way that I wanted to work in Immigration Reform and/or International Business. I wasn’t until I moved to Chicago and worked for the Tribune that I’d realize that I actually belong in Media and Entertainment, not the government. Working in advertising at the Tribune exposed me to a world of creative and media that I long to know more about and this is where my creative career was born.

After reaching my wits' end with Chicago’s brutal weather, I moved to LA never having been here before and made looking for a job full time. A month later, I landed a job (which apparently rarely happens to transplants who move here) working for a direct-response advertising agency assisting a media buyer. I didn’t love it. Numbers and post logs have never been my thing. I did that for about a year before moving on to a post-production house where I worked in Digital Media Services.

In my two and a half years here, I learned quite a bit about new age media and how VOD platforms are drastically changing the way content is digested. It was very interesting, but as much as I learned, I had reached a point in my career of having the strong desire to do something purposeful. Spending 75% of my life at a job that didn’t have purpose or give back was not something I wanted to do anymore.

I came across an opportunity to be a Diversity Program Manager for PromaxBDA. I had zero experience in D&I or Program Development but knew this would be an opportunity I would enjoy and would find purpose. Kat, the VP who interviewed me (and now, my lifelong mentor) took a chance on me and hired me because she felt my passion and commitment to this cause. It was at PromaxBDA that I realized for the first time in my life, that this is where I belonged. This work is the work that I want to do for a lifetime, and that’s to commit to doing what I can to close the access and opportunity gap for aspiring, yet underrepresented creatives, to increase inclusion in our creative industries and to create space of belonging for minorities in this industry.

After PromaxBDA, I worked with the Directors Guild of America and the Association of Independent Commercial Producers to jumpstart their first-ever Commercial Directors Diversity Program, then moved on to PRETTYBIRD, where I am currently spearheading the PIPELINES diversity and inclusion initiative. Here, we are taking a radical, unconventional approach to connecting underrepresented talent to our tech and creative industries through a mobile app. We also host a series of engaging programs and events for our demo as well. I am committed to this and exactly where I belong!

 

 

 

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

On a personal level, life genuinely keeps me motivated. I never take a day that I wake up in the morning for granted. Every (new) day that I have is another literal opportunity to do something different, to take my purpose to a higher level, to be thankful for my many blessings, to spread truth and peace.

Professionally, the amount of work that still needs to be done to create more direct paths the underrepresented to opportunities in our creative industries is what keeps me motivated. I have a “can’t stop, won’t stop” mentality when it comes to my work.

My personal and forever motto is “I don’t need easy; I just need possible”. I heard this in a movie called “Swimfan” and coined it as my personal mantra in everything that I do.

What excites you most about this industry?

That it’s always, always changing, and that the opportunities are limitless. Entertainment and Media are very unique industries that constantly require adaptability and change… and I love change.

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

Hopefully, advertising is moving away from the "safe" and "traditional" and gravitating more towards the radical, boundary-pushing work that’s reflective and inclusive. I believe the next five years look like more biracial parents in commercials, more VR experiences to increase empathy in our branding for example. Brands will also face a challenge of engaging a particular, demanding, and technology-dependent demo. Brands will have to connect with their diverse demo on a deeper, personal, and more emotional level as it’s becoming more about the person and less about the masses. What a time to be alive!

What advice do you have for black advertising professionals who are beginning their careers?

There was a clip we shot of Omar Johnson, former CMO of Beats, explaining his experiences being the “only black person in the room” and what we expressed was so simple yet so powerful and something I will never, ever forget. Being black and in entertainment, there will be many times you will experience being in meetings/rooms/sets where no one or hardly anyone looks like you and while many will view this as a disadvantage, it’s actually quite the opposite. It boils down to perspective. He expressed that once he shifted his perspective, so did the dynamic in his interactions. He said that he views being the only black person in the room as a superpower. A superpower! That your views and ideas are unique, much needed, and unlike any other perspective the majority can offer. You can empathize in ways others cannot. You can offer a view that is special and autonomous. No one can offer your (necessary) view except for you and that is where you find your power, your confidence, your authenticity in your work. A light bulb went off as I watched this clip and not only have I shifted my own perspective, but I encourage other black creatives and professionals to do the same.

What should our industry be talking about in 2018?

What they can be doing specifically to create an inclusive work environment and how they can change/revamp their hiring practices and culture to attract, hire, and retain more diverse talent? Aside from the fact that having more inclusive teams and work environments increase the bottom line, the world and the world of entertainment is evolving drastically and company cultures must do the same.

Any closing thoughts?

“If you don’t prioritize your being, your doing will suffer. It’s simple, but not easy.” – Robyn Ward

 

 

Tags:  #ThinkDIG  #thinkMembers  Diversity  Diversity in Advertising  Member Profiles  Member Spotlight 

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Influential Women in Marketing

Posted By Emily Hope, Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Enjoy this partnered content provided by Laurel Mintz, CEO and Founder of Elevate My Brand. To provide content on your company's behalf, email Emily Hope, emily@thinkla.org

 


Laurel Mintz, Elevate My Brand

 

There have been countless women over the last few decades that have influenced the upward trajectory of our journey. What most have in common is that they understood the value and importance of marketing. From Madam CJ Walker, the first self-made millionaire who turned her own hair loss into a thriving CPG brand, to more current marketing mavens like Alli Webb, founder of Drybar, who also changed the hair game with her bold vision and smart marketing initiatives. These, and countless others, are and have continued to take over the world one marketing message at a time.

Here are some of the women who I think are trailblazers and influence millions with their own brand of marketing.

Social Media - Mari Smith (@marismith) – Even a decade later, consumers and brands alike continue to be stumped by social media marketing. Mari Smith is one of the sharpest and most well-known marketing gurus for small business on Facebook. She is best known for taking $50 and turning it into 500k followers. Now that’s what I call trailblazing with a tangible after burn.

Influencer – Julie Solomon (@julssolomon) – Julie spent years in the PR world, but knew she could help more people by developing a brand to help others understand how to brand and monetize themselves in the influencer world. An influencer in her own right, she now teaches others through her workshops, podcast and extensive social presence. Her infectious smile and warmth is palpable through her stunning pink hued branding as she advises her followers.

Content – Pam Neely (@Pamellaneely) – We used to say content was king, we now know it’s all about engagement through content. Pam Neely is one of, if not the most influential content marketer of our generation. If you need to build your following, e-mail marketing lists, and brand voice, you can’t do better than this content diva.

Experiential – Sarah Boyd (@sarahpboyd) – Also starting her career in the PR world, Sarah had a vision to create events where influencers and brands could engage with each other in a meaningful way. And so Simply Stylist, now Simply, was born. It was such a bold brilliant idea, that media powerhouse NYLON decided they needed it in their stable, appointing Sarah President of West Coast Operations. Sarah now jets from LA to NY to Dubai living her dream and executing her idea as a global experiential brand.

Networking – Sarah Zapp (@sarahzapp) – If you live in LA and don’t know Sarah, you’re at the wrong party. Whether flying off to do content with Martha Stewart in Norway or hosting tastemaker events with Baron Davis, Sarah Zapp is a community builder and one of the most connected women I’m lucky to call a friend.

I always tell our clients, "marketing when done right, it's the funnel to awareness and conversion when you are clear about your KPIs and measure constantly."

The above are just a few of the many ways to market well and, if you’re going to do it, you might as well follow in the footsteps of the trailblazing women who have come before you. Thank you to all the women who make seemingly impossible inroads possible for the rest of us.

By: Laurel Mintz, CEO and Founder of Elevate My Brand and Columnist of On Brand for Inc. Magazine.

Tags:  #ThinkDIG  Diversity  Elevate My Brand  inclusion  Women  Women's History 

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ThinkLA Remembers Peter H. Dailey

Posted By Emily Hope, Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Entrepreneurial advertising executive, former United States Ambassador to Ireland, public servant, and family man, died suddenly on Saturday, March 10, at his home in Pasadena, CA. He was 87 years old. 

 

Born in New Orleans, Dailey graduated from UCLA where he played rugby and football, including in the 1954 Rose Bowl, truly a highlight of his life. He was later inducted into the UCLA Athletic Hall of Fame. After serving in the U.S. Navy from 1954-1956, ending his service as a Lieutenant, he started in the mail room of a Los Angeles advertising agency.

In 1968, Dailey founded Dailey & Associates Advertising; later the Dailey International Group. In 1983, Dailey International merged with the Interpublic Group of Companies, then the world's largest holding company for advertising agencies, and Dailey was named Vice Chairman and Director. At the time, Dailey International Group was the largest international advertising agency headquartered in the western United States, with offices in the U.S., Asia, and Europe.

Truly a public servant, he was appointed U.S. Ambassador to Ireland by President Ronald Reagan in 1982 and served until 1984. Concurrently, in 1983 he served as President Reagan's Special Envoy to NATO member countries for intermediate nuclear weapons public diplomacy. He also served as a member of the Special Planning Group of the National Security Council. Dailey also was appointed by President Reagan as National Chairman for the 40th Annual Celebration of United Nations Day, and in 1988 he served as co-chairman of an international observer group to oversee the national plebiscite on President Pinochet in Chile. From 1985-1989, Dailey served in the Central Intelligence Agency as Counselor to the Director William J. Casey. He was appointed by President Reagan, confirmed by the Senate, and reaffirmed by President George H.W. Bush as a member of the General Advisory Committee of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, a post he held from 1987-1994.

Throughout his advertising career, Dailey took occasional leaves of absence to answer the call to public service, serving as Deputy Director of the 1972 and 1980 Presidential campaigns of Presidents Nixon and Reagan, respectively, and for President Ford in his 1976 Presidential Primary. He also served as a Special Consultant to the State Department from 1980-1981.

After stepping back from the public sector, Dailey began his career as a corporate director and board member. He served as a Director or Trustee of Chicago Title and Trust Company, the U.S. National Park Foundation, Jacobs Engineering Group Inc., the Young President's Organization, the American Association of Advertising Agencies, the American Irish Foundation, The Century Council, the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis; and the Lady Bird Johnson National Wildflower Research Institute, as well as the international advisory boards of Cement Roadstone Holdings PLC (Ireland) and Waterford-Wedgewood (Ireland). He served as both President and Director of the World President's Organization. Always an ardent UCLA Bruin, he served as Director of the UCLA Alumni Association and on the Board of Overseers of UCLA's Anderson Graduate School of Management, and is a founding trustee of the UCLA Foundation.

In his spare time, Dailey and his beautiful wife of 63 years, Jacqueline, raised five children. He is preceded in death by Jacqueline. Left behind are his loving, devoted family including Michael Ann Ewing (Jim), Sydney Jean Dailey, Peter H. Dailey Jr., Elizabeth 'Biz' Dailey (Scott Allen), Patricia Dailey Hayes (Richard) and grandchildren Christopher Ewing, Peter Davis Dailey, and Kathleen, Jack and Margaret Hayes.

Donations may be made in his memory to the Carmelite Sisters of the Most Sacred Heart of Los Angeles, 920 East Alhambra Road, Alhambra, CA 91801.

Tags:  Advertising  Dailey  LA Advertising 

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Spotlight: Bettina Sherick, Founder of Hollywood in Pixels, and SVP, Consumer Insights and Innovation at 20th Century Fox

Posted By Emily Hope, Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Meet Bettina Sherick, Founder of Hollywood in Pixels, a non-profit organization that preserves Hollywood’s vast digital history and celebrates Hollywood's vibrant digital community, and SVP, Consumer Insights and Innovation at 20th Century Fox

 


Photos: Don Lupo Photography

 

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

For most of my career I’ve been in marketing, not advertising. Particularly for those of us in the early days of digital, we were responsible for so much of the digital marketing mix because it was so new, and the traditional teams were focused on TV and print.

I started out in retail and sales. My career really took off after grad school when I launched the e-commerce business for the retailer I worked for at the time. It was 1999, and most people were still trying to figure out their e-commerce strategy, or they were spending millions launching e-commerce sites. I was a marketing manager at the time, and I pitched the idea of launching an online store for a mere $300K. At first I got a "Yes", but then the funding was pulled after a bad financial quarter.

However, I had a friend who was employee number 73 at Yahoo, and she helped me broker a deal to be one of the first stores in the Yahoo Shopping mall. I convinced my employer to fund my project for only $30K. We did get an online store launched for that little amount, and we started selling the very first day we launched. By the first month we were selling at the same rate as one of the small stores, with a fraction of the overhead. I left shortly after the store launch and moved over to Warner Bros. Studio Store as the Director of E-Commerce Marketing.

The AOL merger eliminated my role at WB, and I ended up taking a role with 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment International as their first-ever digital marketing executive. I moved over to the theatrical side of the business and eventually rose to SVP, International Strategic Digital Marketing. After running various digital initiatives at Fox for 14 years, I took some time to pursue other projects and started my own non-profit company: Hollywood in Pixels (HIP). HIP was established to preserve Hollywood’s vast digital history and to connect and celebrate the vibrant Hollywood digital community.

HIP is now three years old, and we keep getting more interest and involvement every year. I recently returned to Fox as well in a new and exciting role as a part of the new Data Strategy group.

 

 

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

My motivation come from within. I have continual drive to be a better (kinder) person, to be the best mom I can be for my son, and to do work that matters. Career-wise, I thrive when I'm working on projects that combine storytelling and tech in a groundbreaking, never-been-done-before way.

I don’t have a personal motto, no. No one go-to platitude.


What excites you most about this industry?

Digital has forever changed the science of advertising and marketing in such a profound way. We can engage with consumers now in ways that once were imagined only in science fiction books and movies. I love living in the future. It excites me, somewhat frightens me, and I feel very lucky to work on a team whose sole raison d'être is to innovate.


Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

The future is all about data. Right now, everyone is trying to figure out what data is important for their business, what’s directional, and what signals and signposts matter. Eventually the data will point the way, but only to those who are willing to listen, try, and experiment. Savvy consumers are already more adept at knowing what data signals they’re leaving for marketers, and that behavior will only get more pervasive. A handful of companies will continue to hold the lion's share of consumer data, but there is room for every company to understand and implement the signals their consumers are willing to share. And, the fight for net neutrality is going to be a big factor in what the future will hold in this arena.


What advice do you have for Black advertising professionals that are beginning their career?

Find mentors. Don’t stop being a student: read articles and blogs, watch online videos, go to seminars, take classes at UCLA Extension or General Assembly. Volunteer. Get involved in your company beyond just your day job; what clubs or interest groups are offered? Take advantage of them. Get to know recruiters for your industry and make sure they know where you are and what you’re working on, even if you’re not looking for a new job.


What should our industry be talking about in 2018?

Inclusivity, intersectionality, diversity. We should be talking (and doing) a lot about those three things.


Any closing thoughts?

Thank you for taking the time to highlight women of color in the industry. I think it’s important, especially now.

Tags:  Bettina Sherick  Entertainment  Fox  Hollywood  Member 

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Member Spotlight: Carron Brown, VP, Account Director, The Integer Group

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, March 7, 2018


Photos: Don Lupo Photography

 

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

A dear friend at Leo Burnett encouraged me to get started in advertising. She was aware of my skillset and knew that my personality and expertise were a good fit for the advertising world. She was absolutely correct. It wasn’t until I began in advertising that I truly felt at home.

Prior to advertising, my background was in entertainment and technology. Therefore, I was able to make an immediate impact in my first agency role on the Universal Pictures account. This account brought all of my passions together under one roof. I was afforded the opportunity to combine my affinity for entertainment, multicultural marketing, media and content creation. Ever since, I’ve built my career with accounts that tap into my passion points and allow me to show up, each and every day, genuinely excited about the challenges and opportunities ahead.

I’ve recently joined the Omnicom family. I work on the AT&T account through the commerce agency, The Collective. In this role, I reside at the intersection of branding, selling, entertainment and technology. I felt that bringing the advertising experience full circle, and closing the loop at retail, was an important skill to add to my portfolio.

 

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

I stay motivated knowing that I’m assisting a brand in finding their authentic voice, and shaping that brand story in a way that connects to the target audience in a meaningful way.

My personal motto is derived from something Maya Angelou once said, “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” I apply that in everything I do, and I aim to move in a way that encourages others, and empowers them to become their best selves.


What excites you most about this industry?

This industry is full of unapologetic passion and energy, and that’s contagious. We have the power to shape the way people see themselves and their place in the world. When used for good, that power is magical.
 

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

The future belongs to the companies that stand for something, and that's exciting. There’s increasingly a price to be paid for neutrality, and this is forcing brands to find their voice, have a POV and move with intention.

In the next five years, agencies will be called upon for their strategic and cultural expertise, in equal proportion to their creative services.


What advice do you have for black advertising professionals that are beginning their career?

Embrace your empirical knowledge. The industry needs many different voices and experiences in order to offer clients well-rounded solutions. The industry is in desperate need of unique points of view. I would give that advise to any person starting out in advertising. Don’t allow your age or level of experience to shape your perception of your value. We’re in a business of culture, and an agency’s cultural currency is only as valuable as the sum experiences of its members. Your unique life experience is an asset. Treat it as such.

What should our industry be talking about in 2018?

In 2018, it’s time to officially acknowledge our new blended world as a reality, and not a niche market. While targeted marketing efforts are still very much needed, in order to ensure that we’re speaking with an audience, and not just at them; our definition of “general market” must quickly expand.


Any closing thoughts?

Be present. It’s all moving so fast.

Tags:  #MemberSpotlight  #ThinkDIG  #ThinkMembers  Career Advice  DIG 

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Celebrating the Women of ThinkLA

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, March 7, 2018

To celebrate International Women's Day, we've highlighted the women of ThinkLA - from our board member badasses to our smiling staffers. It is an honor to work with such brilliant, talented, and infinitely capable women.


 

"There has never been a more exceptional time to be a woman in our industry, in our city—for myriad reasons, and not all of them good.

This is the year women spoke up, fought back, rose to the top of every department and agency. We found courage in ourselves, our friends, our colleagues. We continued to support one another, across and within our companies, hopefully inspiring the next generation to be the strong, compassionate leaders we turned out to be. Sometimes we stumbled. We found an astonishing number of allies to lift us up.

There has never been a more exceptional time. Cheers to these exceptional women.” - Kristi VandenBosch, ThinkLA Executive Board Member, and Chief Digital Officer, MXM

 

 

Megan Amic, IDEA Council

Senior Director, Media, NBC Entertainment, Marketing and Digital

 

Katie Bakunas, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Senior Account Manager, The Trade Desk

 

Leisha Bereson, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

VP, Group Director, Programmatic Canvas Worldwide

 

Alexis Boerger, ThinkLA Board of Directors

VP, Medialink

 

Tenaya Bookout, Young Professionals Council

Account and Strategy Manager, Bradley and Montgomery

 

Sarah Ceglarski, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Partner, Chief Marketing Officer, Omelet

 

Olivia Christian

Event Coordinator, ThinkLA

 

Danielle CiapparaThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Manager, International Planning, Wavemaker 

 

Charlotte Cochrane, IDEA Council

EVP, Managing Director, Digital, Horizon Media 

 

Theresa Collins, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Director of PR, Wieden + Kennedy 

 

Chanel DeVetterThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Marketing Manager, FIDM

 

Serena Duff, ThinkLA Board of Directors

EVP, General Manager, Horizon

 

Susan Franceschini

Executive Director, ThinkLA

 

Andrea Green

Office Manager, ThinkLA

 

Brook Hauge, Young Professionals Council

Client and Strategy Supervisor, Canvas Worldwide

 

Emily Hope

Communications Manager, ThinkLA

 

Sara Hope Smith

Digital Designer, ThinkLA

   
 

Wanda Kato, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Managing Director, OMD

 

Jennifer Klawin, IDEA Council

SVP of Brand Partnerships, West Coast BuzzFeed

 

Myra Marayag, IDEA Council

VP of Sales, Defy Media

 

Jacqueline Melendez

Membership Coordinator, ThinkLA

 

Jasmin Mendoza

Design Intern, ThinkLA

 

Sara Morton, IDEA Council

Consultant

 

Cynthia Pena, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Account Executive, Marketing and Communications, Team One

 

Samantha Perlich, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Director of National Sales, GroundTruth

 

Elizabeth Primm, IDEA Council

Director, Twitter Client Solutions, Twitter

 

Kim Brown Robinson, IDEA Council

Consultant

 

Kendall Rouse, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Customer Success Associate, Blavity

 

Karin Schaer, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Chief Marketing Officer, The Firm

 

Linda Schwab

Director of Events and Sponsorship Director, ThinkLA

 

Lindsay Scoggins

Events Manager, ThinkLA

 

Laura Small, DIG

Vice President, Director of People, RPA

 

Lisa Solomon, IDEA Council 

Consultant 

 

 Lisa Tanner, IDEA Council

Senior Vice President, Group Account Director, RPA

 

Carol Terakawa, ThinkLA Board of Directors

SVP, Strategic Sales Development, Screenvision Media

 

Claire Thompson, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Sr. Strategist, Brand Connections, VICE Media

 

Kristi VandenBosch, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Chief Digital Officer, MXM

 

Liz WeinstenThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Marketing Associate, Gimbal 

 

Jana Wentz, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

VP, Account Director, RPA 

 

Autumn White, IDEA Council 

Head of Digital, West, OMD

 

Heidi Williams, ThinkLA Board of Directors

SVP, Associate Partner, Director of HR, Dailey

 

Roya Zand, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Media Supervisor, Essence Global

Tags:  #ThinkDIG  Diversity  ThinkLA Board  Women at Work 

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Global Wednesday: March

Posted By Emily Hope, Tuesday, March 6, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, March 13, 2018
It's big (ad) world, but we aim to make it feel even smaller by highlighting inventive, global ads, monthly, that break the mold from the mundane. To capture that global spirit, we will feature inspiration from outside of the U.S. and sometimes from brands that we've never even heard of!
 
ThinkLA couldn't be more grateful for Luis Camano, ThinkLA Board Member, award winning creative, and an expert in the field of Brand Activation, for being our Global Warrior and bringing these to our attention. We hope that Global Wednesdays inspires our members as much as it does us.

 

1. How do you translate KFC’s "Finger licking good” in Hong Kong? You don’t, you just show it… in a kinda weird way.

KFC Finger Lickin' Good Edible Nail Polish Case study from John Koay on Vimeo.

 

2. The Louvre has just opened a branch in Abu Dhabi. Worth seeing it. Also worth seeing is the way they promoted it to the public, utilizing “old” media vehicles like radio and billboards. Here’s the "Highway Gallery."

 

3. We know the French are experts when the topic of love comes up. For Valentine’s Day, this chain of French supermarkets confirmed it.

 

4. And finally, a teaser for all Westworld fans. An immersive experience about an immersive experience. To promote season 2, HBO will let fans travel to Sweetwater and explore the space in greater depth. At SXSW this month.

Tags:  Global Ads  Global Wednesday  International Advertising  Luis Camano 

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