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Sunny Behniwal, Senior Account Executive, Adelphic

Posted By Emily Hope, Tuesday, July 3, 2018
Updated: Thursday, July 5, 2018

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

After earning a degree in Economics and Accounting from UCSB, I spent the first two years of my career in Accounting at Conversant. My career in Accounting was progressing well, but I felt I was underutilizing other skill sets I possessed. So I looked to make a change. Luckily, I was working for an AdTech company at the time and was able to move into and Account Manager role on the media team.

After a little over a year, I was promoted to Account Executive (AE). I spent a little over two years in an AE role with my prior company before joining Adelphic-Viant as a Senior Account Executive about a year ago.

What has been a surprising lesson you've learned so far in your career?

I’ve learned that emotional intelligence is one of the most important traits to possess and consistently work on. When I was younger, my thought process was very linear: Work Hard > Get Promoted > Make More Money > Success. However, there will be so many highs and lows during your career that learning how to treat people and react to situations during the lows becomes more important than your behavior during the highs in regard to your long-term success.

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a motto?

I’ve found the happiest people I have come across in my life are those who continue to strive for progress. So, my motivation every day is to make progress whether that be professionally, mentally, spiritually or physically.

Two of my favorite quotes which I often reference are:

  • "I do not believe in taking the right decision; I take a decision and make it right."
  • "You know the comfort zone is never static. It’s always in a state of expansion or retraction."

 




Photos: Don Lupo

 

What excites you most about this industry?

I love how the industry is constantly changing, forcing me to adapt, and continue learning. But more important than that, I love the diversity and inclusion of our industry. I have been able to interact and forge meaningful relationships with individuals from so many different walks of life.

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

The industry is going to continue to consolidate with only truly differentiated companies remaining. With the consolidation, I feel the need for great customer service will be at an all-time high.

Transparency will continue to be a hot button, and I see advertisers moving more and more away from traditional digital KPIs while focusing more on meaningful measurement such as actual online/offline sales.

What advice do you have for those just starting in advertising?

I would advise anyone that is new to advertising to be as open-minded as possible and to try different roles/responsibilities until they find a truly great fit. Luckily for them, our industry has a plethora of job types within our industry ranging from Sales to Engineering to Creative to Analytics, etc. 

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Sunny Behniwal currently serves on ThinkLA's Emerging Leaders Council, and is a Senior Account Executive at Adelphic (a Viant, Inc. company). Prior to joining Adelphic, Sunny worked at Conversant

Tags:  #MemberSpotlight  #ThinkMembers  Career Advice  Member Spotlight  Members  Sales Career  Sales Executive  ThinkLA  ThinkMembers 

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Kristin Glushon, EVP Client Development, Branded Entertainment Network

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, June 27, 2018

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

Although I had a passion for communication, I don’t have a typical advertising career road map. Instead, I started in the research and technology sector, working for Thomson Reuters first as an editor before transitioning into Client Services and B2B Sales.

Interestingly, I think my background gave me a bit of a business consulting approach to the ad world, which I entered after earning my MBA at Pepperdine and taking a role at Interpublic Co. to lead the west coast expansion of one of their specialized media agencies, Orion. This agency experience allowed me to serve clients in every industry, globally and also afforded me the opportunity to support IPG’s Women’s Leadership Network, where I chaired their LA chapter and supported their national board. From there I joined Branded Entertainment Network (BEN) where I currently lead their global client development team, partnering with CEO’s and CMO’s to deliver custom brand integration campaigns into premium content across TV, streaming, film, and influencer programming.

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

I have a lot of respect for those with a strong work ethic, and following that approach keeps me motivated to never give up and to stay focused on delivering what I promise.

In today’s ad world, delivering results often requires us to wear many hats, and although being a mom of two little boys has schooled me in the art of prioritization, I’ve also learned to map out what I can confidently bring to the table and where I need to ask for help.

What excites you most about this industry?

It’s a really exciting time to be working within branded entertainment in particular because of the dramatic shifts we’ve seen in consumer behaviors and the value that integrations offers to reach a more engaged audience. Inside the content, brands have the opportunity to enhance, rather than disrupt, and reach consumers in an authentic and meaningful way. BEN is at the forefront of this evolving marketplace, so every day presents a new opportunity to introduce brands and creators to the power of integration.

 




Photos: Don Lupo

 

Where do you think advertising is headed?

In addition to the shifts in content consumption, I think we’ll continue to see growth in more sophisticated use of data and technology to make advertising more relevant to consumers and more successful for brands.

 What advice do you have for those just starting in advertising?

Regardless if you are just starting your career or sitting at the executive level, I think today’s marketplace requires us to be adaptable, informed and always learning.

I still believe face-to-face networking is the best way to get a head start and to grow your career. Take advantage of mentorship and also pay it forward by being a mentor – and seek out opportunities to learn from others who offer a unique perspective. Having these experiences will enrich your career journey and help support the growth of our industry to reach and engage with today’s diverse and inclusive audiences.

We are in the middle of a cultural shift with the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements. What has/does BEN do to support women and inclusion in the industry?

BEN’s values of teamwork, accountability, passion, and inclusion are a part of our DNA and reflect an entrepreneurial spirit that supports everyone having a voice and an opportunity to make an impact. Today’s cultural shifts further reinforce our commitment to diversity and inclusion, ensuring that our workforce is representative of the multicultural communities where we work and of the brands we represent.

I am also proud to be the executive sponsor of BEN Includes, which is our committee that provides access to programs, services and events to support a workplace and community outreach that is welcoming, equitable and empowering to achieve success for BEN and our clients.

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Kristin Glushon currently serves on ThinkLA's Diversity, Inclusion, and Gender (DIG) Committee, and is Executive Vice President of Client Development at Branded Entertainment Network (BEN). Prior to joining BEN, Kristin worked at Orion Worldwide.

 

Tags:  #MemberSpotlight  #ThinkMembers  Member Spotlight  Members  ThinkLA  ThinkMembers 

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Member Spotlight: Frank Scherma, President, RadicalMedia

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, June 13, 2018

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

I started off as an assistant producer at Chiat Day N.Y. when they first opened their doors. Soon after, I was producing for the agency. Three years went by, and I left to freelance (there weren’t that many freelance producers in the market at that time) and worked for Ammirati Puris on BMW. Three years after that, I moved to Los Angeles and began producing for production companies and their directors. Eighteen months later, I opened up the West Coast office of my partner’s production company. We built that company into what it is today: RadicalMedia, LLC.

And how has the industry changed since you’ve been involved?

When I started in advertising, television, print and radio were the main ways to reach the consumer. My parents were grateful to advertisers as they brought entertainment into our living room. Since then, we’ve had to adjust from strictly doing commercials, print, and radio. While those three still exist, we’ve all had to learn and embrace additional ways to reach the consumer. Branded content and digital storytelling, live events, memes, etc. We also work with brands who’ve begun to incorporate VR, AR, and experiential media into their storytelling as well, and I think we’ll start seeing more of that as time goes on. It’s still about the storytelling, just using different methods.

What’s an important lesson you’ve learned so far?

Be nice to everyone. Today’s assistant could be tomorrow’s creative director. Secondly, don’t be afraid of change. Embrace it and dive in head first.

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

My goal in life is to wake up everyday and still want to go to work. I’ve succeeded so far. I also try to live by Radical’s motto, which is "Never Established." Things are always changing, and it’s important to adapt to the times. If you want longevity, you have to be able to do it all: feature films, episodic scripted and unscripted television, advertising, experiential, public events, smartphone applications... the list goes on.

What excites you most about this industry?

The people, creativity, and the fact that it’s ever-changing. Everyday I learn something new.

 


Photos: Don Lupo

 

 Where is the entertainment industry headed? What do the next 5 years look like?

As I mentioned, it will always be about storytelling and finding an audience for those stories. Five years from now, streaming services will be even more prevalent than they are today. Network TV will still be there, albeit they will be looking for additional revenue streams from advertisers and cable/satellite companies.

What advice do you have for those just starting out in entertainment?

I have a few pieces of advice for those just starting out in the business.

One: Be the first one to show up and the last one to leave. It’s a bit cliché, but you have to make it known that you want to be there and you want to learn. Two: Ask lots and lots of questions, and don’t be afraid to not know the answer. The worst is pretending to know, when you really don’t. Third: Watch, listen, and get your hands dirty. Be open to trying new things and taking a different path. You never know where something can lead you. And lastly, step out of your comfort zone.

We are in the middle of a cultural shift with the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements. What has/does Radical do to support women and inclusion in the industry?

RadicalMedia not only has a diverse staff, but a diverse roster of directors. As I like to say, we have directors that happen to be female, not female directors. We want everyone to feel like they’re working in a safe environment, always. That’s not up for debate.

Why are you involved with ThinkLA?

I enjoy working with the varied and interesting people on the board. It combines media, creativity, public relations, etc., in one place, kind of how ad agencies used to operate. And not to be cliché, but it’s rewarding to give back to an industry that has treated me very well over the years.

At the end of the day, I love what I do, and I think that’s the most important thing of all. 

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Frank Sherma is a ThinkLA Board Member and President of RadicalMedia, a multi-disciplinary studio that creates some of the world’s most innovative content across all forms of media. RadicalMedia has been honored with an Academy Award®, Emmys®, a Golden Globe®, Grammys®, Webbys, NASA Awards, The Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt National Design Award for Communication Design, two Palme d’Ors at the Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival, and just about every other accolade and trophy associated with the advertising, marketing, and programming businesses.

 

 

Tags:  #MemberSpotlight  #MeToo  #ThinkMembers  Entertainment  Entertainment Marketing  Member Spotlight  Members  ThinkLA  ThinkMembers 

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Member Spotlight: Kristina Jenkins, Chief Strategy Officer, Zambezi

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, May 30, 2018

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

Believe it or not, I have E.T. and the Reese’s Pieces candy he loved eating to thank for my start in advertising. My mom took me to see the movie to celebrate my eighth birthday and when the final credits started rolling, I turned to her and asked if she could please take me to the store to buy some Reese’s Pieces. When I took my first bite I didn’t like them at all (yuck; M&Ms tasted so much better, I thought), but I kept eating them because E.T. did.

I knew the influence the movie had on me and I was fascinated. I wanted to be part of creating that type of influence one day, by inspiring people to make choices that they enjoyed. Advertising seemed like a way (at least to my 8-year-old self) to do that, and so here I am.

E.T. inspired my start and me in countless other ways. He showed me that even if you don’t see yourself in the place you dream of being a part of, that doesn’t mean that you won’t get there. I never saw a Kristina Jenkins in any of the cultural expressions of who worked in advertising growing up (I’m not Darren from Bewitched or Amanda from Melrose Place). I still rarely see her today. But I’m here in the place of my dreams.

He also helped me discover that inspiration resides in the most unexpected places like aliens and in candy. It doesn’t matter where or who your dream comes from; it’s where you take it.

Throughout my career, I’ve followed an inner compass more than a road map. My career started with a calling that gave me a vision for what I wanted to be and why. I wasn’t always exactly sure where I wanted to go. There were many times when I got distracted, disappointed or lost during my career. And when I did, I closed my eyes and thought back to that moment when I watching E.T. with my mom in a Long Island movie theater. It’s the moment when I decided that I would do extraordinary things in advertising. I remember how I wanted to help influence people in positive ways. Then I opened my eyes, promised myself I would settle for nothing less, took some time to get clear on where I was going and figured out a way to get there.

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

What keeps me motivated is thinking about all the people who are made to feel that it’s not okay to be different, who encounter “no” and “can’t“ and “never“ again and again while they’re pursuing their dreams and goals. I think about a generation of talent that is growing up right now dreaming about being a Chief Strategy Officer one day, and I keep doing what I’m doing so that they can see themselves in what I do and what I am, and so that they have someone who inspires them to do great things in this industry, to remind them not to let anyone talk them out of their dream or make them doubt the difference they can make.

 



Photos: Don Lupo

 

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned?

When I found the courage to be myself and do things my way and take on roles that allowed me to think and collaborate with supportive talent, that’s when I realized there was nothing I couldn’t achieve. I’m totally comfortable working with companies that aren’t always the “it” award-winning agencies with the top clients in the hottest cities. I’ve learned to look past all that and focus on my own vision and larger purpose, and on my career. I look for the right opportunities with the right companies at the right time. That’s what I’ve learned to do.

What excites you most about this industry?

Complex business problems and heightened consumer expectations are creating all sorts of opportunities for agencies and their leaders to let go and re-imagine existing strategic staffing models, fundamentals, frameworks, and playbooks. This excites me the most. In too many instances, we’re relying on 20th century ways of working to solve 21st century challenges. This industry can be more of catalyst for what’s new and what’s never been done before.

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

I think it’s going to be challenged in unprecedented ways. Those that hang on and resist change will become irrelevant. Those who create opportunity out of these challenges will thrive.

What advice do you have for those just starting in advertising?

Discover that you’re different. Surround yourself with people who believe in your “different.” Master your “different.” Push boundaries with your “different.” Help others unlock and confidently charge forward with their “different.”

This industry may try to make you feel that you are lucky to work in it. That’s how the industry made me feel when I first started. Remember that this industry needs you. We need your optimism, courage, energy, and “different" to help us re-imagine the way things have always been done.

Be the strongest version of yourself, mentally, spiritually and physically. This industry requires a level of strength like you can’t imagine. Unapologetically create space and time to take care of yourself and recharge.

I’ve made all my career decisions by listening to my heart. For example, saying "Yes" early in my career to what many saw was a huge mistake (leaving a big NYC TV agency to live in the sunshine in L.A., while also working at a digital agency). There also was a time when I said "Thank you, but no thank you" to working 24/7 at some of the most prestigious agencies on the most iconic brands, so I could say "Yes" to working with a company that designed a role around me and the life I wanted.

Start by asking yourself what life you want. Then think about the job you want and where.

You’ve worked in advertising in both coasts. Which does it better?

They are very different and offer very different opportunities. There is nothing like working in advertising in N.Y. It’s a city that celebrates sophistication and polish. It’s a city of random collisions that lead to collaborations and ideas that otherwise wouldn’t exist. Agencies own their point of view. There is an electricity that fills their walls, along with a relentless pursuit of greatness. It forces you to assert yourself in unprecedented ways. It humbles you and challenges you with setbacks where you have to decide if you are going to get back up and try again daily.

Los Angeles is bright, optimistic and full of possibility. It doesn’t take itself so seriously. I once read that California is the place that New Yorkers go when they want to be a better version of themselves. I’ve found that to be true. It’s a great place to be as a talent if you want to experiment with new ways of approaching things. It gives you space and permission to recharge, and encourages you to use the inspiration that emerges when you do in your work.

What should our industry be talking about in 2018?

I’d love to hear more conversation about what senior leaders can learn from talent that is brand new to the advertising industry. They have much to teach us. I’ve always wanted to create a program where someone who is a year into their career mentored someone who has been in the business for 20 years.

Any closing thoughts?

We never do great things alone. There are so many people who have been part of helping me get to a place where I can inspire others. To each and every one of them I say, "Thank you".

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Kristina Jenkins is Chief Strategy Officer at Zambezi. Prior to joining Zambezi, Kristina was Culture Intelligence Officer at mcgarrybowen. 

Tags:  #MemberSpotlight  #ThinkMembers  Member Spotlight  Members  ThinkLA  ThinkMembers 

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Member Spotlight: Cynthia Pena, Account Executive, Marketing and Communications

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, April 11, 2018

 


How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

I studied PR but I kind of fell into advertising. When I graduated, I was working weddings on the side, and a contact through there also worked in the ad world managing events and facilities. While working a month-long agency project under her, I ended up falling in love with the work and culture.

I stayed on in this hybrid role they created including facilities, reception, and barista. I ended up meeting a ton of people in the agency, (learned how to make bomb lattes) and within a few months, I easily transferred into their PR department. Ever since, I’ve always been involved in events in some capacity, but my main focus has been agency communications and marketing.

 

 

What excites you most about this industry?

The fact it’s always evolving. The ways brands are reaching consumers and joining conversations are never the same. When you see someone do it in a clever way and actually add value, it’s gold.

Why are you involved with ThinkLA?

It’s the perfect opportunity to not only meet and network with others throughout LA, but also to make a difference and impact the events in our industry. Even early in your career, you have a voice and opinions, ThinkLA lets you explore both.

What’s the best advice you’d give to someone interested in a career in advertising? Are there any written materials you suggest to read?

Find someone already doing what you want to do and ask for coffee or 10 minutes of their time. See what you can learn from them and how they got to where they are.

For reading materials: Read the trades! Know what’s going on in the industry, the trends, the changes. It’s all valuable.



Photos: Martin Aranda

 

Tags:  #Memb  #MemberSpotlight  #ThinkMembers  Marketing  Member Spotlight  Members  Team One  Team One USA  ThinkLA  ThinkMembers 

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Fireside Chats with Jun Group

Posted By Emily Hope, Monday, December 18, 2017

In partnership with Jun Group, we set out to find out what top marketers are doing to attract talent and stay ahead of the curve, win new business, and set Los Angeles apart.

 

Adam Tabachnikoff, Senior Vice President, Global Marketing, The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf

“The easy part and the fun part about being a CMO is doing videos, its going on photoshoots—but when I walk into my board meetings, what really becomes sexy is the analytics and the numbers. The prettiest POP (point of purchase display), the best social media, —whether its a JPEG or a short video—are fun to present, but what really goes well, is when we have the analytics and data to show what the ROI was...that we actually drove incremental traffic and profitable sales." 

 

Chris Athens: Associate Media Director, Maxus

“People are not necessarily only converting digitally; in fact, the majority of conversions happen on-air. Breaking down that conversion silo is something that we’ve been trying to tackle with certain partners. Understanding where people are watching, how they’re consuming [video content], and then trying that back to the ad exposure."

 

Lisa Nichols, Chief Data Officer, Partner, Bloom Ads Global Media Group

"Finding the right people is very challenging. Today, we look to people who have a coding background, people who have mathematical brain, people that understand statistical relevance. But on the other side, talent still must be creative.”

 

Claire Thompson: Senior Strategist, Vice Media

“We take a very hard line on what we feel is ‘crossing a line’ and making it unclear that something is an advertisement. If we weren’t being so protective of our brand and ensuring that we are not tricking our readers, then we lose integrity with our audience… which is precisely why we are successful and is why we are attractive to advertisers in the first place.”

 

Don Lupo: Director of Content and Marketing, ThinkLA

“What’s concerning is something that we call agency 3.0. Agencies have to be far more nimble than they were, they have to offer a full set of services and experiences, that maybe you [the agency] did not provide directly in the past. Digital strategists, social media strategists, information architecture and UX (user experience specialists) which is not always something that an agency hired for. The agency has evolved.”

 

Joey Adler: Chief Executive Officer, Carve Nutrition, Founder, Department of Good

"My motto is: I don’t want to do anything in business that doesn’t support the community. The Department of Good is that. It’s a platform, and it will be the first time I believe that a platform will work with small independent business (focusing on brick and mortar) in a collaborative way. We want to support the small independent brick and mortar store. We want to support community organizations. We want to support people with innovative ideas. And we want to support the consumer to have an experience and to be part of something [community focused]. And we have give back up and down the supply chain.”

 

Paul Pastor: Executive Vice President, Strategy, Revenue and Operations, Discovery Channel

“Pulling the entire story out of our consumer base across multiple platforms is not easy. What we’ve been able to do is work with our own first party data, with third party vendors, and then with the Nielsen’s and Comscores of the world to put together a comprehensive view of consumers at various stages across different platforms. This informs the content investment we make and how we think about the partnerships we have with advertisers.”

 

Stephanie Friend, Associate Integrated Media Director, Bloom Ads Global Media Group

“We’re making big movements forward to establish dashboards that link up to all of our digital partners and our DMP. We find the best way to attribute [business ROI] to each medium. We are also in the business of testing — i.e. just TV versus just radio, versus just digital, and showing how that really compares to a truly fully integrated campaign.”

Tags:  #ThinkMembers  Brand Marketers  Fireside Chats  Jun Group  LA Advertising  Marketing  Member Profiles  ThinkLA 

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A Musical Conversation with Saatchi and Saatchi's AdJam Band, Ampersand

Posted By Sara H. Smith, Monday, September 25, 2017


Are you old enough to remember mosh pits? Can you tell me what a mosh was?
Mosh comes from “Nosh” – which is the Yiddish word for “eating” or “hungry”. A mosh pit resembles a traditional dance called “the hora” that is done at bar mitzvahs and jewish weddings. As the dance ends, attendees then “nosh” (eat the meal). At the Rainbow Theatre, London, on December 31, 1977, the Ramones recorded their live record “It’s Alive”. In between songs, Joey Ramone (who was Jewish) can be heard advising the crowd of rowdy punks “Ay youse guys, you gotta be careful in the nosh pit”. On the recording it sounds like “mosh pit”.

What else could the letters EDM stand for? Electro Dynamic Magnets (how do they work?)

Who ripped the holes in your jeans, you or someone in China? My dog ate my homework. And my jeans.

Tags:  #AdJam  #ThinkAdJam  AdJam  AdJam2017  Advertising Agency Bands  Battle of the Bands  LA Advertising  The Novo DTLA  ThinkLA 

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A Musical Conversation with Innocean's AdJam Band, HB Riots

Posted By Sara H. Smith, Monday, September 25, 2017


Have you been to a festival this year? Do you have any money left? 
No and no.

If you went to a festival this year, did you lose anything? Your car keys? Your wristband? Your lunch in a port-o-let? Probably would have lost a little dignity.

How many people in your agency or office play an instrument? Why aren’t they with you onstage?
We have 38 guitar players. They didn’t make the cut.

How is a client call like attending a music festival? (You know, crowd too big, people elbowing to get in front, happens over two weekends…) Lots of noise with very little substance until the end of the call.

Are you old enough to remember mosh pits? Can you tell me what a mosh was? Yes. Mosh pit: noun – an area in which purposefully thrust your body into several random, sweaty, overly amped strangers. It’s not as fun as it sounds.

Have you ever had to choose between two favorite bands who were on at the same time? What was were your criteria? Do you use that same criteria in your agency life? No.

What else could the letters EDM stand for? Especially Despicable Mother-In-Law

Why did you choose your festival song? Have you seen it performed live? Is it Haim? ‘Cause Haim is totally way better live, right? Haim makes me more sleepy than turkey

Do you have any reefer? Thanks. Be cool, man.


If you could be any animal, would it be the muppet drummer?
I see what you did there, and the answer is yes.


Tits, bits and pits. Discuss.
Everyone has them. End of discussion.


Who ripped the holes in your jeans, you or someone in China? We prefer cargo pants and chinos.

Has a guitar ever gotten you laid? What is the best brand of guitar for getting one laid? Asking for a friend. I think I’m beginning to understand the Muppet thing.

Why did you name your band that? Really. Is your mom okay with it?
My mom picked it out, and she’s thrilled.

Whose Spotify playlist would you rather hear:

  • Kim Jong-un’s or Jared Kushner’s? Kim’s because, K-Pop. DUH, Muppet man
  • Kid Rock or Kid Cudi? Cudi.
  • Steve Bannon or Pennywise the Dancing Clown? (Or is it the same playlist?) Same playlist, same person.

It’s been 10 years. Is it okay that we are still leaving Britney alone? Yes, leave her in the past (and Vegas).

Tags:  #AdJam  #ThinkAdJam  AdJam  AdJam2017  Advertising  Agency Bands  Battle of the Bands  LA Advertising  The Novo DTLA  ThinkLA 

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Say 'Hello' to our New Logo!

Posted By Emily Hope, Monday, August 1, 2016



We're celebrating 10 years as the premiere marketing association in Southern California. To mark the occasion and honor the many contributions of our members, we've updated our logo.

We'd like to offer big thanks to our friends at TBWA\Chiat\Day for their work in designing our new logo and branding. Thanks to them, we have a new face as we continue to connect, inspire, and educate the Los Angeles marketing, media, and advertising community. 

It all starts with you, our members, and our community of like-minded, passionate and dedicated industry thought leaders. Here's to the next 10 years working with you! 

Tags:  #thinkLA  Branding  TBWA\Chiat\Day  thinkla  thinkla news  thinkLA's 10 Year Anniversary 

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ThinkLA Names New Co-Presidents and Directors

Posted By Emily Hope, Tuesday, February 16, 2016

ThinkLA has named two Co-Presidents: Kristi VandenBosch, Chief Digital Officer at MXM, and Tim Hand, VP of OEM Sales-West at Kelley Blue Book. The new executives succeed Eric Johnson, President of Ignited, and Jerry McGee, President of the 4As Western Region. They had served in that capacity for 4 years, and will now act as Co-Chairmen to the Office of the President.

 

Prior to joining MXM three years ago, VandenBosch was CEO of Publicis & Hal Riney and Publicis Modem in San Francisco. She also led a regional network for TBWA Worldwide, as U.S. President of digital agency TEQUILA. Hand has been with Kelley Blue Book for more than 14 years, and in his current role almost four years. A veteran of the publishing industry, he has had sales roles at Salon, Time Inc., and the Los Angeles Times. “ThinkLA spans the entire advertising world, from agencies to publishing, and our new Co-Presidents bring experience from both of those disciplines. This is great news for the LA creative community,” says Susan Franceschini, Executive Director of ThinkLA.

  

In addition to the new leaders, ThinkLA has added two new directors to its board. Jeff White is Partner and Chief Marketing Officer at Deutsch North America, while Adam Gerhart is West Coast Lead at MindShare. All appointments are effective immediately.

Tags:  Board of Directors  Kristi VandenBosch  Leadership  ThinkLA  ThinkLAnews  Tim Hand 

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