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ELC LIVE!: Path To The She Suite Recap

Posted By Don Lupo, Monday, October 29, 2018

Written by Jessica McEwan, Copywriter at RPA




Photos: Linda Schwab

It was already dark outside when I arrived at ELC’s “Path to the She Suite” event, but inside Zambezi it was warm and bright. Women (and a few men) mingled together, chatting and taking pictures with a lightbox that said, “Welcome, Lady Bosses!”

Claire Thompson, Associate Director of Brand Connections at VICE Media was our moderator for the evening, introducing us to our panel of:

  • Sarah Ceglarski, Partner and CMO at Omelet
  • Jiah Choi, Partner and CEO at Anomaly
  • Jean Freeman, Principal and CEO at Zambezi
  • Sheila Marmon, Founder and CEO of Mirror Digital
  • Yumi Prentice, President and Managing Partner at David&Goliath

With so much success in the room, the first question focused, naturally, on failure. What had the panelists learned from it? Sheila Marmon urged us to remember that being laid off is not the end of the world, but it is important to always be aware of what is happening in your industry and be mindful of when it might be time to make a move. Jiah Choi recalled a time when she accepted a new job and was unhappy for months, but now feels it prepared her for her current role. Jean Freeman added that failure needs to be seen as part of the process, and that if you are just chugging along smoothly, you aren’t growing and learning from experience.

All of the women spoke about the importance of mentorship and how vital it is to learn from the experience of others. Sheila remarked that in addition to having strong mentorship, it’s important to really take a look at the power structures of the organization you are in. “It is important to position yourself in places where someone will hand you the baton.” Sarah Ceglarski pointed out that “your enemies are your greatest teachers, and as a leader not only do you need to be open to discourse and uncomfortable discussions, you need to lead those conversations.”




When asked what accomplishments they were proud of, Yumi Prentice shared that she is very proud that David&Goliath is a signatory to Times Up Advertising, and that they were promoting mental health by adding a mental-health day to their PTO package. Jean lamented that there is too much talk about diversity and not enough action, reminding us that “leading by example means holding yourself accountable.” She put that into practice by updating Zambezi’s benefits package to be more family-friendly.




The final panel question of the evening: “What’s a must-do in life?”

“Floss. And lead with compassion and integrity. If you don’t, the cost is too great to yourself.”
 – Yumi Prentice

“Be an agent for your own success. Don’t wait for someone to hand you that next opportunity. If you see a gap in your organization, fill it. Become an asset.” – Sheila Marmon

“Everyone should experience a U.S. National Park at some point in their life. Get outside and away from technology. Unplug.” – Jean Freeman

“Values are not values until they cost you something. Know what is sacred to you and protect it.” – Jiah Choi

“You must be empathetic. That’s more important than what you can learn in school. It’s how you connect and understand who you are talking to.” – Sarah Ceglarski

From there, Claire opened the panel up to Q&A. A small-business owner was having a hard time letting go of doing to focus on leading and wanted advice how to better manage that. Jean suggested she be honest with herself. If you’ve been in the same position for years and haven’t let go, do you really want to? Jiah remarked, “Neither you nor your business will grow if you are just doing.” Sheila suggested she bring on someone better than herself at the doing, so that she would feel comfortable handing off responsibility.

After a few more questions, Claire said there was time for one more. I raised my hand. Throughout the panel discussion, my eye had been wandering to the lightbox sign I mentioned earlier. I wondered, how did the women feel about this term, “Lady Boss?” Yumi chimed in first, saying she respected it and thought it had its place, and that there is an underscore to saying we are bosses who don’t fit the normal mold. Jean said she was looking forward to the rising of Gen Z, who don’t look to make everything so male or female. Jiah said, “I respect it, but I hate it. But I think that’s where we are. I’m looking forward to the day that we aren’t.” Perhaps the most empowering response, though, came from Sheila. “Being a lady boss doesn’t keep me from being a boss.”





Key Takeaways:

“Careers are a jungle gym, not a ladder.” – Sheryl Sandberg

“There is no work/life balance, there’s only work/life integration. You just have to enjoy what you do. The only way you can spend this much time working is if you like it.” – Jiah Choi

“Be open to discourse and uncomfortable conversations. That is part of your job. If you want to be a leader, you have to lead those conversations. If you have an issue with someone, you have to talk to them and sit them down and say, ‘I have an issue with you.’ That is such a powerful thing that I’ve only recently learned to do. But don’t assume malice every time. Pull back your immediate emotional reaction.” – Sarah Ceglarski

“People in successful leadership positions are curious and always looking to grow. Warren Buffet spends half his day reading.” – Jean Freeman

“Remember that when you get to where you are going, the people you need to mentor may not look like you or have the same background.” – Sheila Marmon

“There are incremental things you can do to promote diversity and equality. It doesn’t always have to mean joining a huge movement.” – Yumi Prentice

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Jessica McEwan is a copywriter at RPA and an instructor for The Book Shop School for Ads.



Tags:  #ThinkELC  #thinkStars  C Level Women  ELC Live!  Membership  professional development  She Suite  Women at Work  Women in Advertising 

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Pose&Focus: Women In Advertising

Posted By Emily Hope, Monday, March 26, 2018

Earlier this year, we were thrilled to come across an ultra-fresh Instagram feed: @lin_marty, Linda (Lin) Marty's photography page. The instagram feed is beautifully designed, screams BOSS LADY, and has beautiful, bohemian portraits of many our ad friends. After a bit of research, we were even more elated to learn the message behind these gorgeous images.

Pose&Focus: Women In Advertising is Lin's personal passion project, dedicated to highlighting women in the advertising industry through interviews and creative expression. The imagery is a creative portrayal of who they are beyond the corporate meetings, events, and brands they work with. Their stories will be honest, comical and informative that look to inspire all female professionals within the industry to thrive.

"Having been in the business for over a decade, I found it very important for women (and men) to support female leadership in our community and industry," says Lin. "Especially with our current political climate, this mission is more important to me than ever before. I want our female readers to know when they come here they will get solid advice and actionable steps that they can use to elevate their own careers."

 

 

Photos: Lin Marty Photography

View the entire series at linmartyphotography.com. Nominations for Pose&Focus Vol. 3 are open until April 2. Nominations must be female, located in Los Angeles, and currently work in the advertising industry (agency, sales, ad tech, production, etc.) with at least three years of experience. Contact Lin for more details. 

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About Linda: Linda is founder, creative director, and photographer of Lin Marty Photography. She is dedicated to supporting influencers, creative entrepreneurs, and boutique businesses to discover, define, and elevate their digital brand identity through beautiful and professional portrait and product photography. Prior to becoming a photographer, Linda worked in advertising, most recently at Canvas Worldwide as VP, Director, Digital Investment.

The series is supported by makeup artist, Julia Alexander, and body paint artist, Scott Richards.

Tags:  #ThinkDIG  Lin Marty  Pose&Focus  Women at Work  Women in Advertising 

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Celebrating the Women of ThinkLA

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, March 7, 2018

To celebrate International Women's Day, we've highlighted the women of ThinkLA - from our board member badasses to our smiling staffers. It is an honor to work with such brilliant, talented, and infinitely capable women.


 

"There has never been a more exceptional time to be a woman in our industry, in our city—for myriad reasons, and not all of them good.

This is the year women spoke up, fought back, rose to the top of every department and agency. We found courage in ourselves, our friends, our colleagues. We continued to support one another, across and within our companies, hopefully inspiring the next generation to be the strong, compassionate leaders we turned out to be. Sometimes we stumbled. We found an astonishing number of allies to lift us up.

There has never been a more exceptional time. Cheers to these exceptional women.” - Kristi VandenBosch, ThinkLA Executive Board Member, and Chief Digital Officer, MXM

 

 

Megan Amic, IDEA Council

Senior Director, Media, NBC Entertainment, Marketing and Digital

 

Katie Bakunas, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Senior Account Manager, The Trade Desk

 

Leisha Bereson, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

VP, Group Director, Programmatic Canvas Worldwide

 

Alexis Boerger, ThinkLA Board of Directors

VP, Medialink

 

Tenaya Bookout, Young Professionals Council

Account and Strategy Manager, Bradley and Montgomery

 

Sarah Ceglarski, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Partner, Chief Marketing Officer, Omelet

 

Olivia Christian

Event Coordinator, ThinkLA

 

Danielle CiapparaThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Manager, International Planning, Wavemaker 

 

Charlotte Cochrane, IDEA Council

EVP, Managing Director, Digital, Horizon Media 

 

Theresa Collins, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Director of PR, Wieden + Kennedy 

 

Chanel DeVetterThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Marketing Manager, FIDM

 

Serena Duff, ThinkLA Board of Directors

EVP, General Manager, Horizon

 

Susan Franceschini

Executive Director, ThinkLA

 

Andrea Green

Office Manager, ThinkLA

 

Brook Hauge, Young Professionals Council

Client and Strategy Supervisor, Canvas Worldwide

 

Emily Hope

Communications Manager, ThinkLA

 

Sara Hope Smith

Digital Designer, ThinkLA

   
 

Wanda Kato, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Managing Director, OMD

 

Jennifer Klawin, IDEA Council

SVP of Brand Partnerships, West Coast BuzzFeed

 

Myra Marayag, IDEA Council

VP of Sales, Defy Media

 

Jacqueline Melendez

Membership Coordinator, ThinkLA

 

Jasmin Mendoza

Design Intern, ThinkLA

 

Sara Morton, IDEA Council

Consultant

 

Cynthia Pena, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Account Executive, Marketing and Communications, Team One

 

Samantha Perlich, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Director of National Sales, GroundTruth

 

Elizabeth Primm, IDEA Council

Director, Twitter Client Solutions, Twitter

 

Kim Brown Robinson, IDEA Council

Consultant

 

Kendall Rouse, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Customer Success Associate, Blavity

 

Karin Schaer, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Chief Marketing Officer, The Firm

 

Linda Schwab

Director of Events and Sponsorship Director, ThinkLA

 

Lindsay Scoggins

Events Manager, ThinkLA

 

Laura Small, DIG

Vice President, Director of People, RPA

 

Lisa Solomon, IDEA Council 

Consultant 

 

 Lisa Tanner, IDEA Council

Senior Vice President, Group Account Director, RPA

 

Carol Terakawa, ThinkLA Board of Directors

SVP, Strategic Sales Development, Screenvision Media

 

Claire Thompson, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Sr. Strategist, Brand Connections, VICE Media

 

Kristi VandenBosch, ThinkLA Board of Directors

Chief Digital Officer, MXM

 

Liz WeinstenThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Marketing Associate, Gimbal 

 

Jana Wentz, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

VP, Account Director, RPA 

 

Autumn White, IDEA Council 

Head of Digital, West, OMD

 

Heidi Williams, ThinkLA Board of Directors

SVP, Associate Partner, Director of HR, Dailey

 

Roya Zand, ThinkLA Young Professionals Council

Media Supervisor, Essence Global

Tags:  #ThinkDIG  Diversity  ThinkLA Board  Women at Work 

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Interview With Kathryn Schotthoefer - How To Live Big At Work

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, August 30, 2017
Updated: Monday, October 16, 2017

 Interview With Kathryn Schotthoefer - How To Live Big At Work
By Chelsea Szabo

Kathryn Schotthoefer is a powerful entertainment & lifestyle marketer with experience developing programs for the world’s largest film, TV, SVOD and digital media brands, as well as Fortune 100 companies. Throughout her career, she’s stayed committed to living big at work.

How do you define "living big at work"?

Living big at work is having control over your own life and your career. It’s being respected by people you respect within your field. It’s looking ahead, knowing where you want to go and having the hustle to get there.

What is the difference between someone living big at work vs. someone living small?

Living big looks different to everyone, but at its core, living big is working for yourself - even if you’re employed by a big corporation. Regardless, of where the paycheck comes from, you do work in your day-to-day that you find satisfying: intellectually, emotionally, creatively, and professionally. If you’re living small, you’re just a cog in someone else’s machine.

Everyone has the ability to live big, however he or she defines it. The key to getting there is understanding what living big means to you personally, on a philosophical level, and being open to following it – while putting in the hard work that makes it a reality.

What tips would you give a woman who wants to start living bigger at work?

1.     Build your natural confidence. Knowing who you are and the value that you offer is at the core of building a successful career. Just like you, it will evolves and grows over time. Remind yourself of your value often and, while it is important to listen to constructive criticism, resist the urge to internalize it. When you first start out in a career, confidence can feel a bit forced, but with experience and reinforcement from success, it will become second nature. When you reach this level of confidence, you won’t ask yourself “Can I do this?”, but “How do I make this happen?” Confidence is essential to embrace big risks, which is the precursor to big rewards.

2.     Discover your values & stick to them. Knowing your values and sticking to them is incredibly important in everything you do – especially in your career. This can often mean making difficult - and unpopular - decisions like turning down a project or client, declining to engage with negative people, or taking a public stand against something that conflicts with your values. Each time you honor your values with your actions, it will reinforce your confidence and commitment. 

LISTEN TO THEIR FULL CONVERSATION HERE

Tags:  Chelsea Szabo  Live Big at Work  Thrive  Verbal Courage  Women at Work 

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