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Aaron Walton: Finding Your Uncomfortable Zone

Posted By Don Lupo, Wednesday, April 3, 2019

By Aaron Walton
Photo by Kal Yee


Pose star and Tony award winner Billy Porter set the bar high for authenticity before the Oscars had even begun. He arrived on the Red Carpet in a ball gown tux designed by Project Runway’s Christian Siriano. ‘People are going to be really uncomfortable with my black ass in a ball gown," Porter wrote. "But it’s not anybody’s business but mine." And that was the kind of cultural confidence that shifted the 91st Academy Awards out of its conservative comfort zone and into the 21st century, celebrating talent from communities of color and diverse cultures.

Regina King, the evening’s first winner, built on Porter’s tone-setting style by dedicating her win to Beale Street author James Baldwin. Mr. Baldwin instantly became the top trending search on Google trends, underscoring why representation matters. From the red carpet to the acceptance speeches to the social media conversations, marketers and the ad industry have much to learn from a new Hollywood, particularly about how the powerful role we play as image makers and identity influencers impacts our responsibility to reflect and respect societal change. Here are three key takeaways:

1. Get comfortable with being uncomfortable

As humans, we tend to be uncomfortable with the unknown. It’s a survival instinct. It’s why bias, which we all carry in one form or another, acts as a shorthand for sameness which we tend to believe will keep us safe.  As marketers, we are obligated to get comfortable with being uncomfortable. It is our responsibility to our brands and to consumers to tap into a spectrum of perspectives, psychographics and consumer profiles. Whether it’s gender fluidity in the form of a ball gown tux or understanding the Black-centric social commentaries of an author like James Baldwin, the message from a new generation of diverse talent was unapologetic – particularly in relation to what’s unknown and, therefore, uncomfortable, to dominant-culture leadership. Time to catch up. As advertising and marketing industry diversity programs stumble and fall short of expectations, we too cannot keep doing the same thing and expecting different results. For an industry that prides itself on pop-culture prowess and its ability to laser target individuals in the micro-ist of ways, we have blinders on when it comes to some uncomfortable truths. Our industry doesn’t give credit to culture, it often minimizes the importance of creative contributors from diverse backgrounds, and has turned inclusion into an exercise of consensus instead of a celebration of uniqueness.

2. Practice centering

In spite of D&I efforts, there is very little work being done by clients or agencies when it comes to centering people of color and diverse cultures. Centering is loosely defined as being committed to racial, gender and cultural equity, having diverse stakeholders be in control of resources, and recognizing them for their expertise. The Oscars showed us what centering is and what it is not. Black Panther epitomizes the former while Green Book reflects the latter. Late night host Seth Meyers created an excellent commentary on the White Savior film prototype which, many agree, is how Green Book can be classified. Even when agencies add multicultural talent to their teams, they do little to empower them to lead, or even to simply engage, from a cultural POV. On a positive note, one can look at the work aired by Verizon during the Oscars, specifically the unsubtitled Spanish language work, an Oscar first, and see what centering looks like. While not all Latinos are Spanish speakers, the brand had the cultural courage to unapologetically communicate with those within the community who are; to put their voice center stage without worrying about backlash from an intolerant, often monolingual subset of consumers. Stop thinking of resources like the proverbial pie with a finite number of slices.  Cultural fluency expands us all and, with this commitment to growth, opportunities multiply and there are more than enough to go around. The pie gets larger.

3.  Why "winclusion" matters

If there was ever any doubt about the influence of culture on the psyche of millennials and Boomers alike, one need only listen to Rami Malek, Regina King, Hannah Beachler, Spike Lee, and Spiderman’s Peter Ramsey and Phil Lord, among others. While they may be celebrities today, each of these winners was once a child, standing in front of a mirror and dreaming about what winning an Oscar would be like. And they all wondered why they never saw anyone like themselves represented. "Winclusion" is not just access, it’s advancement and an ability to assume roles worthy of awards – the kind of awards that make history and give voice to those who are often unrepresented and marginalized both in front of and behind the camera. How is your organization rewriting the rules of inclusion, reframing the idea so it’s not just an invitation to a club whose rules and values are already set in stone, leaving little room for authenticity and cultural confidence? 

During a Black History Month fraught with politicians wearing black face and other ignorant offenses, the Oscars managed to demonstrate that progress can be made and respect can be paid. Was it a seismic shift or an anomaly? Time will tell. What is clear is that diverse storytellers, and the consumers they inspire, are done asking for permission to be a part of the societal fabric they influence and impact in the most innovative ways. And those same cultural champions, and the communities with which they connect, are putting our industry on notice as well. Uncomfortable? Good. You should be.

Aaron Walton
is a founding partner of Walton Isaacson.

Tags:  aaron  advertising  creative  diversity  inclusion  uncomfortable  walton 

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Volunteer Spotlight: Danielle Erves

Posted By Administration, Thursday, January 31, 2019

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

I graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in public relations from San Jose State University and was lucky to get my first job at a PR agency in Oakland right out of college. From there, I moved to Los Angeles and started at Jukin Media, a digital media company that helps people make money from their videos on the internet. There, I was lucky enough to be able to work on the company’s marketing, PR, and social media

My interest in marketing and public relations started at an early age in high school marketing things like school dances and alumni events. Once I began to study it in college, it opened up a new method of communication for me.

What inspired you to become a ThinkLA volunteer?

I attended my first ThinkLA event three years ago.
I saw all the amazing people hustling, sharing, and building with each other. I knew I needed to get involved.

What’s been one of your favorite ThinkLA memories?

My favorite ThinkLA memory is from Toys for Tots last year. My coworkers and I had a crazy couple of weeks and had just wrapped up. We ended up laughing and dancing the night away. Work hard, Play hard..

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

My personal motto is: You can’t have a bad day if you’re smiling. I try to smile all day long, I’m in a good mood and good things happen. If I do get into a funk, I put on my favorite song and jam out! I’ll be back to smiling soon after that.

Are there any written materials you suggest to read?

The best advice I can give to anyone regardless of their industry is to keep learning and reading. It’s so important to want to learn more, otherwise the world will pass you by. One reading suggestion is The Alchemist. One of my good friends gave it to me to read and it changed my mindset.

What advice do you have for female ad professionals who are beginning their careers?

Have a voice early in your career and establish yourself as a leader and someone who deserves a seat at the table. Know what you are worth and ask for it. Don’t be afraid to speak up.

Any closing thoughts for the ThinkLA community?

The first year I started with ThinkLA, I taught an Account Management 101 class and it was so rewarding to feel like I was making a difference to someone starting out in their career. The feedback I got was so positive, it only confirmed that mentoring and helping people around me grow, learn, and move up is one of the best things about my job. But I’m not gonna lie: the Award Show Gala after-parties never disappoint!

Any closing thoughts for the ThinkLA community?

The ThinkLA community is very unique and I’m very happy to be apart of it. It can be a difficult to know how to navigate organizations similar to ThinkLA, but the community ThinkLA has built is on the fosters up and coming professionals and educates the community in a fun way. I’m very happy to be part of it..

--------- 

Danielle Erves 

  • website: ervesconsulting.com
  • IG: @ervespr_
  • Twitter: @ervespr
  • LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/danielleerves

 

Tags:  #Thinkla  #thinkMembers  #volunteerspolight  Advertising  L 

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ThinkLA Remembers Peter H. Dailey

Posted By Emily Hope, Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Entrepreneurial advertising executive, former United States Ambassador to Ireland, public servant, and family man, died suddenly on Saturday, March 10, at his home in Pasadena, CA. He was 87 years old. 

 

Born in New Orleans, Dailey graduated from UCLA where he played rugby and football, including in the 1954 Rose Bowl, truly a highlight of his life. He was later inducted into the UCLA Athletic Hall of Fame. After serving in the U.S. Navy from 1954-1956, ending his service as a Lieutenant, he started in the mail room of a Los Angeles advertising agency.

In 1968, Dailey founded Dailey & Associates Advertising; later the Dailey International Group. In 1983, Dailey International merged with the Interpublic Group of Companies, then the world's largest holding company for advertising agencies, and Dailey was named Vice Chairman and Director. At the time, Dailey International Group was the largest international advertising agency headquartered in the western United States, with offices in the U.S., Asia, and Europe.

Truly a public servant, he was appointed U.S. Ambassador to Ireland by President Ronald Reagan in 1982 and served until 1984. Concurrently, in 1983 he served as President Reagan's Special Envoy to NATO member countries for intermediate nuclear weapons public diplomacy. He also served as a member of the Special Planning Group of the National Security Council. Dailey also was appointed by President Reagan as National Chairman for the 40th Annual Celebration of United Nations Day, and in 1988 he served as co-chairman of an international observer group to oversee the national plebiscite on President Pinochet in Chile. From 1985-1989, Dailey served in the Central Intelligence Agency as Counselor to the Director William J. Casey. He was appointed by President Reagan, confirmed by the Senate, and reaffirmed by President George H.W. Bush as a member of the General Advisory Committee of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, a post he held from 1987-1994.

Throughout his advertising career, Dailey took occasional leaves of absence to answer the call to public service, serving as Deputy Director of the 1972 and 1980 Presidential campaigns of Presidents Nixon and Reagan, respectively, and for President Ford in his 1976 Presidential Primary. He also served as a Special Consultant to the State Department from 1980-1981.

After stepping back from the public sector, Dailey began his career as a corporate director and board member. He served as a Director or Trustee of Chicago Title and Trust Company, the U.S. National Park Foundation, Jacobs Engineering Group Inc., the Young President's Organization, the American Association of Advertising Agencies, the American Irish Foundation, The Century Council, the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis; and the Lady Bird Johnson National Wildflower Research Institute, as well as the international advisory boards of Cement Roadstone Holdings PLC (Ireland) and Waterford-Wedgewood (Ireland). He served as both President and Director of the World President's Organization. Always an ardent UCLA Bruin, he served as Director of the UCLA Alumni Association and on the Board of Overseers of UCLA's Anderson Graduate School of Management, and is a founding trustee of the UCLA Foundation.

In his spare time, Dailey and his beautiful wife of 63 years, Jacqueline, raised five children. He is preceded in death by Jacqueline. Left behind are his loving, devoted family including Michael Ann Ewing (Jim), Sydney Jean Dailey, Peter H. Dailey Jr., Elizabeth 'Biz' Dailey (Scott Allen), Patricia Dailey Hayes (Richard) and grandchildren Christopher Ewing, Peter Davis Dailey, and Kathleen, Jack and Margaret Hayes.

Donations may be made in his memory to the Carmelite Sisters of the Most Sacred Heart of Los Angeles, 920 East Alhambra Road, Alhambra, CA 91801.

Tags:  Advertising  Dailey  LA Advertising 

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Member Spotlight: Ed Chambliss, CEO, Phelps

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Photos: Don Lupo Photography

 

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

When I was seven years old, I visited my Uncle’s post-production studio. I was fascinated by how commercials were put together - all the tools and tricks that went into creating an ad. I wanted to use those tools to tell stories, which led me to my initial career as a copywriter. While working at BBDO, I taught a series of courses in creativity at The Portfolio Center and came to realize that while I was a good creative, I wasn’t a great one. What I was great at was brand and creative strategy. So I left copywriting and enrolled in the Masters of Integrated of Marketing Communication program at the University of Colorado in Boulder. When I graduated, Joe Phelps hired me to be a mid-level account guy. Over the last 18 years I’ve pitched and led accounts, and led the agency through a succession of roles – first as chief operating officer, then president and now CEO.

 

   

 

What keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

I’m on a quest. And have been for a most of my career. There just has to be a better way for companies to interact with customers. When two people have a conversation, everything is relatively straightforward. The conversation flows both ways. People talk. People listen. The conversation progresses and benefits both sides. But when a company tries to communicate as one entity, it’s a train wreck. Listening seems to be optional (or at least intermittent) and speaking only seems to clumsily advance the brand’s interests. So I wake up every day, knowing deep down inside that this can be fixed. It’s a big problem that clearly can’t be solved overnight. But I think we, as an industry, can do it to the benefit of everyone involved.

 

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned so far?

Customers are people. It sounds simple, but so many things our industry does completely ignore the fact that on the other end of our communications isn’t a “target” but an individual human being – a protagonist in their own narrative filled with pains, joys, drama and desires. We ignore that at our own peril.

 

What excites you most about this industry?

Thanks to technology, we’re entering an era where marketing can serve people, and we can establish authentic, equitable relationships between people and brands. As we continue to get more information about people, we come to understand how communications can support rather than interrupt their lives.

 

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

We’re on the road to either distinction or extinction, depending on the struggle between convenience and quality and how we use data as a result. If quality wins, advertising will become more relevant to people than ever, because we’ll mine data to understand individual needs and create brand conversations with meaning and utility. If convenience wins, we will become little more than technicians shoveling data around, helping our clients stalk prospects with no regard for what they want.

 

Why are you involved with ThinkLA?

Our business is so competitive. We’re constantly trying to edge each other out of the way so that we can win (or retain) clients. We need to remember that we’re also a community. It’s important and rewarding to take a moment every once in a while to enjoy each other’s company (and war stories) and help each other overcome shared challenges. Also, who doesn’t love AdJam?

 

What advice do you have for those just starting in advertising?

Learn the software. Learn to code. But don’t stop there. Learn to speak. Learn to write. Learn about people, particularly what cements our shared humanity. And learn about yourself. You’ll need all of those skills to succeed.

 

Any closing thoughts?

The ancient Greek philosopher Epictetus said something advertising needs to live by if we’re to earn a meaningful place in the emerging world: “We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak.

Tags:  #ThinkMembers  Advertising  CEO  Ed Chambliss  LA Advertising  Member  Phelps  PhelpsAdvertising 

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Super Bowl LII - ThinkLA Member Ads and Insights

Posted By Emily Hope, Monday, February 5, 2018

Every year, we remind Madison Ave. that the West Coast means business when it comes to Super Bowl advertising spends. Below is our annual list of #BigGame spots, promotions and insights that came from our corporate members. Enjoy! 

SUPERBOWL SPOTS

Saatchi & Saatchi | Toyota - Mobility Anthem

 

Saatchi & Saatchi | Toyota: One Team

 

Saatchi & Saatchi | Toyota, Good Odds

 

Saatchi & Saatchi | Tide, It's a Tide Ad

  

Saatchi & Saatchi | Tide, It's Another Tide Ad

 

Saatchi & Saatchi | Tide, It's Yet Another Tide Ad

 

Saatchi & Saatchi | Tide, It's Yet Another Tide Ad Again

 

Walton Isaacson | Lexus / Marvel Studios Black Panther

 

Amazon | Amazon Alexa

 

Amazon Prime Video | Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan 

 

David&Goliath | Kia

 

David&Goliath | Jack In The Box

 

Hulu | Hulu Castle Rock

 

Innocean USA | Hyundai Kona

 

SUPERBOWL INSIGHTS

Alphonso | Ad Insights Center

Alphonso tracked the performance of all Super Bowl LII ads in real time, with their Alphonso Ad Insights Center. Attribution reports for Super Bowl ads, using CPG sales data, credit card data, location data and tune-in data will be posted within three weeks.

 

Kantar Media | The Numbers

Kantar Media’s preliminary estimate of in-game ad expenditures for Super Bowl LII, subject to revision, is $414 million. This would be the second largest amount in history besides last year’s game, which was the first to run into overtime.

Read more: https://www.kantarmedia.com/us/thinking-and-resources/blog/super-bowl-lii-the-numbers

 

Verizon Media | Tests the Limits of 5G

Super Bowl LII was the backdrop for a quiet 5G proving ground, as Verizon (VZ) tested an in-stadium pre-commercial 5G network connection to demonstrate how massive speed and bandwidth can bring live video and virtual reality experiences to new levels.

Read more: https://seekingalpha.com/pr/17064954-shhh-verizon-network-engineers-quietly-worked-behind-scenes-super-bowl-lii-test-limits-5g

 

Jumpstart Automotive | Media Super Bowl Report


Jumpstart Automotive released its annual Super Bowl report, which reveals the auto brands that drove the greatest traffic increases across its portfolio of publishers. Super Bowl LII, which registered 103.4 million viewers, saw advertising from several car brands during pre-game, the halftime show, and the game itself, including Toyota, Kia, Hyundai, Lexus, Ram, Jeep, and Mercedes-Benz.

View the report: https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2018/02/06/1333882/0/en/Kia-Lexus-and-Jeep-See-Highest-Traffic-Lifts-During-Super-Bowl-LII.html

 

Tags:  #ThinkMembers  Advertising  Alphonso  Amazon  Corporate Members  D&G  David&Goliath  Hulu  Hyundai  Innocean  Jumpstart Auto  Kantar Media  Lexus  Los Angeles Advertising  Saatchi & Saatchi  SBLII  Super Bowl LII  Verizon Media  Walton Isaacson 

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Member Spotlight: Bupendra Ram

Posted By Emily Hope, Tuesday, January 30, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, February 6, 2018

How did you get started in advertising? What's been your career road map?

Ethnically, I am Indian, but I was born in the Fiji Islands. I came to the U.S. when I was two years old when my family fled Fiji because of a political coup. We got a tourist visa to enter the U.S. Before we left, we met a man who was charging people $10,000 for an opportunity to get a green card as soon as we entered the U.S.

Upon our arrival in the U.S., we were presented with a green card. By the time we realized it was a hoax, we had overstayed and became undocumented. At the age of 23, I became Undocumented and Unafraid, and Queer and Unashamed. At this time, I joined passionate and resilient people to fight for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) and help people understand that immigration is a global issue and not just for people south of our border.

In 2014, as a strong and unified community, we helped the Obama administration do the right thing by partnering with hundreds of lawyers to provide him with the legal groundings to provide administrative relief to a category of undocumented youth.

 

Don Lupo Photography

 

As a recipient of DACA, my career in Human Resources has been relatively short but full of adventure and growth.

When I received DACA, I started to think about the opportunities that were not previously available or open to me. As a natural community builder and networker, I reached out to people and conducted informational interviews. I quickly learned that Human Resources would be the perfect blend of my love for business and people. In addition, I would be able to take my learnings back to my respective communities in two ways: 

  • I would learn how to support people from disadvantaged background with career planning, structuring and formatting their resume, branding themselves, and improving their interviewing skills;
  • I would learn the how to help others like me gain access to opportunities not always open to people with my experience or those who look like me.

The overall goal would be to become a Diversity and Inclusion practitioner to aggressively impact corporate culture.

Three years ago, I accepted an internship that would give me a broad understanding of Human Resources and gain practical experience. After outgrowing that role, I found an amazing opportunity as a Human Resources Coordinator at my first advertising agency, Hawthorne. I loved working with some of the most passionate and dedicated people in the industry. I directly impacted Hawthorne’s culture by helping them create a culture of trust and accountability. I loved helping their agency grow and be a place where people loved waking up and going to.

A year later, I was offered an opportunity to join Innocean USA with more responsibilities and an opportunity to be a part of a dynamic group of HR professionals. I was able to quickly learn more HR skills and dive into areas of HR that I am passionate about – diversity and Inclusion, employee relations, recruiting, and change management. Currently, through sheer determination, I am working in a field that I’m passionate about and love: Diversity and Inclusion at Live Nation as a Diversity and Inclusion Coordinator.

 

 

What (who) keeps you motivated? Do you have a personal motto?

My mom keeps me motivated. She continues to sacrifice so much so that I can have the experiences and opportunities that I am having. She left Fiji to travel to a place she had no idea about, had the courage to leave her abusive husband, and thrive when all the odds were against her.

Personal motto: “Why not?” I have always been told that I cannot achieve my goals because I am either undocumented, queer, a person of color, or an array of other reasons. I think sometimes we hold ourselves back because of our own subjugation and what we think is “normal.” I always try to figure out a way around challenges and push boundaries as much as I can.

 

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned so far?

I have learned that mistakes are your best friend. They help you learn and get better at what you do. It shows that you are in the arena and fighting to succeed. I have just learned how to be accountable for my mistakes, learn from them, and move on.

 

What excites you most about this industry?

Simply, it's the people. I think that marketing, advertising, and entertainment attract some of the most amazing and diverse people. Everyone is so passionate about what they do and creative that it makes work fun. Also, each day is so different that it forces you to find creative solutions to business challenges.

 

Where is advertising heading? What do the next five years look like?

The industry is molding to adapt to the changing demographics of people within the United States and abroad. People are rejecting binaries, labels, and identities that pigeonhole them. The blanketed approach to sell or entertain generalized demographics is not going to work.

Over the next five years, I think that the industry will be trying to understand how they can cater to this new demographic and rebrand themselves. For example, so many women are telling their #MeToo story and some are taking it a step further to make sure that we are changing who we are as a society and industry. We are going to have to move forward together and embrace the differences that make us unique and who we are. People want organization to reflect their values and the diversity that they see around them.

 

Why are you involved with ThinkLA?

I love ThinkLA and value their collaborative frame of connecting advertising agencies and supplying them with tools to be successful. I have been working with them for over a year through their Diversity, Inclusion, and Gender (DIG) initiative to help create tools and resources for our industry and highlighting opportunities related to diversity, inclusion, and gender for our industry, and allowing us to harness the power of our unique backgrounds to the greater good.

 

What advice do you have for those just starting in advertising?

Network and let people know what you are passionate about. Since I started a career in HR, I went to most networking events and met as many people as I could. During every interaction, I found a way to tell everyone and anyone that would hear me that I want to practice diversity and inclusion. The industry is very small, everyone knows each other, and most people are open to mentoring and supporting you.

 

In Adobe's recent "Creativity’s Diversity Disconnect" study, which highlighted diversity issues in the advertising industry, 54% responded that the industry was “getting better compared to five years ago,” while 7% actually said it was getting worse. And a resounding number of minorities described lack of access and seeing themselves reflected in the workplace. As a member of ThinkLA’s DIG initiative, what are your thoughts on these findings? How can the industry improve?

I am not completely surprised by the results. There has been a shift to address issues around diversity, but more work needs to be done around inclusion. Diversity needs to be done in an authentic way without ignoring the intersectionality of individuals with the support of people from dominant groups. Diversity impacts all of us and everyone needs to be involved to address these issues within their respective organization. I wholeheartedly believe that – together – we can get to a place where people can bring their full selves to the workplace.

 

Any closing thoughts?

Be yourself – your whole self – your authentic self. It makes everything so much easier.

 

 

Tags:  #ThinkDIG  Advertising  Bupendra Ram  Career Advice  DACA  Diversity  Diversity in Advertising  Immigration  Innocean  Live Nation  Member Spotlight 

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Global Wednesday: January

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, January 3, 2018
It's big (ad) world, but we aim to make it feel even smaller by highlighting inventive, global ads, monthly, that are breaking the mold from the mundane. To capture that global spirit, we will feature inspiration from outside of the U.S. and sometimes from brands that we've never even heard of!
 
ThinkLA couldn't be more grateful for Luis Camano, ThinkLA Board Member and Head of Innovation and Brand Activation LC/BA, for being our Global Warrior and bringing these to our attention. We hope that Global Wednesdays will inspire our members as much as it does us.


1. Here’s how a Peruvian company turned the much maligned fruitcake (or those who bake them) into a Holiday-stress reducer.


 

2. From Germany, a color became a portal and a vehicle for incredible entertainment.


 
 
3. In India, candy solved a problem for both customers and retailers, becoming an accepted type of currency.

 

Tags:  advertising  Global Ads  Global Wednesday  international advertising  international brands  Luis Camano 

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2018 Marketing and Advertising Predictions

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, January 3, 2018

What's in store for advertising and marketing in 2018? Here's a few thoughts from the ThinkLA community.

RISE OF WOMEN IN LEADERSHIP

"I predict the continued rise of women into the C-suite, as our skills, strengths and values become increasingly critical to the business success of our agencies, our holding companies, and our clients.”
Kristi VandenBosch, Chief Digital Officer, MXM, and ThinkLA Board of Directors Co-President

FUTURE OF VIRTUAL REALITY

"2018 will see VR become more widely accepted not only as entertainment, but as a valuable consumer training tool, especially when it comes to site walk-throughs for travel and commercial applications. It will become a viable first step toward fully immersive environments for all people." 
- Don Lupo, Director of Content and Marketing, ThinkLA

IN-HOUSE PROGRAMMATIC BUYING

"I envision more small and mid-tier agencies following suit of larger agencies, by taking control of their programmatic media buying, and bringing it in-house to utilize a self-service DSP. More advertisers will be looking towards meaningful KPI's - such as offline sales measurement, while traditional KPI's - such as CTR and VCR, will continue to become less relevant."
- Sunny Behniwal, Senior Account Executive, Adelphic, a Viant Inc. Company, and ThinkLA Young Professionals Council Member

A FOCUS ON BRAND VALUES

"2017 forced both brands and agencies to think hard about their values, whether in their responses to the new political climate or to the#MeToomovement. In 2018, people won't be able to hide behind messaging. Marketers will have to decide what they believe, act upon it—and be judged accordingly.”
Jeff Sweat, Founder, Mister Sweatand ThinkLA Board of Directors Member

MICRO INFLUENCERS

"I think we'll see a rise in the "micro-influencer". Given the crowded digital arena, brands will need to have an authentic message to break through the noise, to engage and interact with their costumers. The use of influencers, partners, customers (perhaps through testimonials), and even showcasing employees, will all be relatable ways for brands to tell their stories."
Emily Hope, Communications Manager, ThinkLA

ACQUISITIONS

"Deloitte or Accenture will make a bid to acquire one of the four largest ad agency holding companies.”
Eric Johnson, President and Founder, Ignitedand ThinkLA Board of Directors Member

  SEARCH

"Search will be an x-factor for premium publishers in scaling traffic to quality (not to mention measurable, viewable, safe) content. Where social has long been the dominant source of publisher traffic, a trending uptick in search referral traffic could mean significant monetization opportunities for publishers."
- Claire Thompson, Senior Strategist, VICE Media, and ThinkLA Young Professionals Council Member

AUGMENTED REALITY

"Due to the investments companies like Google and Facebook are making, I believe augmented reality will be adopted by the masses in 2018. We’ll see brands trying to navigate their way through the immersive technology space to see which tech suits their brand/product, and I believe that AR will be that platform."
John Yi, Communications Director, Strategy, MBMGand ThinkLA Young Professionals Council Member

QUALITY CONTENT

"Everyone is on the "content" bandwagon but very few are doing it correctly and effectively. For example, a few CMOs I’ve spoken to, are taking cause marketing in-house to integrate them into their brands, to start putting emphasis on quality communications."

MODULAR MARKETING

"Traditional marketing campaigns will be replaced by Modular Marketing. We will see less identical campaigns, more modular framework for communication. This will allow marketers to be more flexible and able to replace themes, offers, messages within the framework."
Luis Camano, Founder and Chief Creative Officer, Key Activationsand ThinkLA Board of Directors Member

 

MOVEMENTS TURNING MOBILE

"2018 will be a year where all the things we have started in years past, will become more relevant and refined. Ideas, strategies, data, content is all growing to be more agile. We'll see movements be mobile. And, I don’t mean that device that is attached to us at all times, I mean movements that are going new places, transitioning, evolving. We will see adaptive strategies, policies and people, doing things in new more ‘mobile ways’.  

 

Life/work balance (vs. work/life) will be more mainstream as people take life/work on the road, and the increase in collaborate workspaces will continue to change the way the workforce operates. This attitude can be seen in how #MeToo is growing to evolve into bigger conversations, such as #TimesUp.

 

We will see immersive experiences that people will travel for; to interact with brands, art and culture in a single multifaceted event (like 29Rooms, DesertX, Museum of Ice Cream). Big data will finally be activated in a way that can be used in a meaningful way for the consumer, as we now know how to both use it for targeting and content curation."

- Brook Hauge, Strategy Supervisor, Canvas Worldwide, and ThinkLA Young Professionals Council Co-President

 

INDEPENDENT AGENCIES WILL REMAIN APPEALING TO ADVERTISERS

"I’m being a bit selfish here by focusing on a trend that will benefit independent agencies like ours. Although large holding companies will maintain a large share of the market, independent agencies will continue to position themselves as viable alternatives to larger agency networks and win accounts. The stable independent agencies will build enough scale to attract talent, take on more business and provide a high level of service to advertisers."
- Zach Rosenberg, President, MBMG, and ThinkLA Board of Directors Member 

 

 

 


Tags:  2018  acquisitions  advertising  Brand Marketer  earch  marketing  media  micro-influencers  Mobile movements  modular marketing  Quality Content  uture of  uture of Advertising 

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Global Wednesdays with Luis Camano

Posted By Emily Hope, Wednesday, December 6, 2017
It's big (ad) world, but we aim to make it feel even smaller by highlighting inventive, global ads, monthly, that are breaking the mold from the mundane. To capture that global spirit, we will feature inspiration from outside of the U.S. and sometimes from brands that we've never even heard of!
 
ThinkLA couldn't be more grateful for Luis Camano, ThinkLA Board Member and Head of Innovation and Brand Activation LC/BA, for being our Global Warrior and bringing these to our attention. We hope that Global Wednesdays will inspire our members as much as it does us.

 

1. Muji, the Japanese company that sells “no-brand quality goods”, has created an eye-popping installation for the Holidays (made entirely with pens, of course). 

 

2. Beer plugs from Denmark. Enough said.

Beer Plugs | Tuborg from CP+B Copenhagen on Vimeo.

 

3. Here’s how to make a promotion exciting and participatory. Plus generating a ton of content from consumers. 

Opel - Betaal met views | Compilatie inzendingen from J. Walter Thompson Amsterdam on Vimeo.

 

 

Tags:  Advertising  Global Ads  Global Wednesdays  International Advertising  International Marketing  Luis Camano 

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A Musical Conversation with Canvas' AdJam Band, Blank Canvas

Posted By Web Admin, Wednesday, September 27, 2017


Have you been to a festival this year? Do you have any money left? 
We work in advertising so no… and no. Ok…maybe 1. #millennials

If you went to a festival this year, did you lose anything? Your car keys? Your wristband? Your lunch in a port-o-let? Just dignity. Lots of dignity.

How many people in your agency or office play an instrument? Why aren’t they with you onstage?
…They’re at the bar…

Who ripped the holes in your jeans, you or someone in China?Cardi B

Are you old enough to remember mosh pits? Can you tell me what a mosh was? This question is condescending…*Googles ‘who is mosh?’*

Whose Spotify playlist would you rather hear:

  • Kim Jong-un’s or Jared Kushner’s? Kim Jong-Un’s
  • Kid Rock or Kid Cudi? KIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIID Cudi, obviously.
  • Steve Bannon or Pennywise the Dancing Clown? Same playlist full of circus music.

It’s been 10 years. Is it okay that we are still leaving Britney alone? Yes – What we NEED to be talking about is the New Taylor killing the Old Taylor. Talk. About. Drama.

Tags:  #AdJam  AdJam  AdJam2017  Advertising  Agency Bands  Battle of the Bands  The Novo DTLA  ThinkAdJam 

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